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Most votes on android-layout questions 1

Most votes on android-layout questions 1. #1 What is the difference between "px", "dip", "dp" and "sp"? #2 What is the difference between match_parent and fill_parent? #3 What is the difference between gravity and layout_gravity in Android? #4 You need to use a Theme.AppCompat theme (or descendant) with this activity #5 What's "tools:context" in Android layout files? #6 How to hide the title bar for an Activity in XML with existing custom theme #7 How to change fontFamily of TextView in Android #8 How do I put a border around an Android textview? #9 Standard Android Button with a different color #10 Can I underline text in an Android layout?

Read all the top votes questions and answers in a single page.

#1: What is the difference between "px", "dip", "dp" and "sp"? (Score: 6029)

Created: 2010-01-08 Last updated: 2018-12-03

Tags: android, android-layout, user-interface, dimension, units-of-measurement

What is the difference between Android units of measure?

  • px
  • dip
  • dp
  • sp

#1 Best answer 1 of What is the difference between "px", "dip", "dp" and "sp"? (Score: 5945)

Created: 2010-01-08 Last updated: 2020-12-22

From the Android Developer Documentation:

  1. px
    > Pixels - corresponds to actual pixels on the screen.

  2. in
    > Inches - based on the physical size of the screen.
    > 1 Inch = 2.54 centimeters

  3. mm
    > Millimeters - based on the physical size of the screen.

  4. pt
    > Points - 1/72 of an inch based on the physical size of the screen.

  5. dp or dip
    > Density-independent Pixels - an abstract unit that is based on the physical density of the screen. These units are relative to a 160 dpi screen, so one dp is one pixel on a 160 dpi screen. The ratio of dp-to-pixel will change with the screen density, but not necessarily in direct proportion. Note: The compiler accepts both “dip” and “dp”, though “dp” is more consistent with “sp”.

  6. sp
    > Scaleable Pixels OR scale-independent pixels - this is like the dp unit, but it is also scaled by the user’s font size preference. It is recommended you use this unit when specifying font sizes, so they will be adjusted for both the screen density and user’s preference. Note, the Android documentation is inconsistent on what sp actually stands for, one doc says “scale-independent pixels”, the other says “scaleable pixels”.

From Understanding Density Independence In Android:

Density Bucket Screen Density Physical Size Pixel Size
ldpi 120 dpi 0.5 x 0.5 in 0.5 in * 120 dpi = 60x60 px
mdpi 160 dpi 0.5 x 0.5 in 0.5 in * 160 dpi = 80x80 px
hdpi 240 dpi 0.5 x 0.5 in 0.5 in * 240 dpi = 120x120 px
xhdpi 320 dpi 0.5 x 0.5 in 0.5 in * 320 dpi = 160x160 px
xxhdpi 480 dpi 0.5 x 0.5 in 0.5 in * 480 dpi = 240x240 px
xxxhdpi 640 dpi 0.5 x 0.5 in 0.5 in * 640 dpi = 320x320 px
Unit Description Units Per Physical Inch Density Independent? Same Physical Size On Every Screen?
px Pixels Varies No No
in Inches 1 Yes Yes
mm Millimeters 25.4 Yes Yes
pt Points 72 Yes Yes
dp Density Independent Pixels ~160 Yes No
sp Scale Independent Pixels ~160 Yes No

More info can be also be found in the Google Design Documentation.

#1 Best answer 2 of What is the difference between "px", "dip", "dp" and "sp"?(Score: 712)

Created: 2011-02-25 Last updated: 2018-11-27

Pretty much everything about this and how to achieve the best support for multiple screens of different sizes and densities is very well documented here:

Screen size
Actual physical size, measured as the screen’s diagonal. For simplicity, Android groups all actual screen sizes into four generalized sizes: small, normal, large, and extra-large.

Screen density
The number of pixels within a physical area of the screen; usually referred to as dpi (dots per inch). For example, a “low” density screen has fewer pixels within a given physical area, compared to a “normal” or “high” density screen. For simplicity, Android groups all actual screen densities into six generalized densities: low, medium, high, extra-high, extra-extra-high, and extra-extra-extra-high.

Orientation
The orientation of the screen from the user’s point of view. This is either landscape or portrait, meaning that the screen’s aspect ratio is either wide or tall, respectively. Be aware that not only do different devices operate in different orientations by default, but the orientation can change at runtime when the user rotates the device.

Resolution
The total number of physical pixels on a screen. When adding support for multiple screens, applications do not work directly with resolution; applications should be concerned only with screen size and density, as specified by the generalized size and density groups.

Density-independent pixel (dp)
A virtual pixel unit that you should use when defining UI layout, to express layout dimensions or position in a density-independent way. The density-independent pixel is equivalent to one physical pixel on a 160 dpi screen, which is the baseline density assumed by the system for a “medium” density screen. At runtime, the system transparently handles any scaling of the dp units, as necessary, based on the actual density of the screen in use. The conversion of dp units to screen pixels is simple: px = dp * (dpi / 160). For example, on a 240 dpi screen, 1 dp equals 1.5 physical pixels. You should always use dp units when defining your application’s UI, to ensure proper display of your UI on screens with different densities.

If you are any serious about developing an Android app for more than one type of device, you should have read the screens support development document at least once. In addition to that, it is always a good thing to know the actual number of active devices that have a particular screen configuration.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#2: What is the difference between match_parent and fill_parent? (Score: 1429)

Created: 2011-04-23 Last updated: 2014-03-12

Tags: android, android-layout

I’m a little confused about two XML properties: match_parent and fill_parent. It seems that both are the same. Is there any difference between them?

#2 Best answer 1 of What is the difference between match_parent and fill_parent? (Score: 1249)

Created: 2011-04-23

They’re the same thing (in API Level 8+). Use match_parent.

FILL_PARENT (renamed MATCH_PARENT in API Level 8 and higher), which means that the view wants to be as big as its parent (minus padding)

fill_parent: The view should be as big as its parent (minus padding). This constant is deprecated starting from API Level 8 and is replaced by match_parent.

http://developer.android.com/reference/android/view/ViewGroup.LayoutParams.html

#2 Best answer 2 of What is the difference between match_parent and fill_parent?(Score: 253)

Created: 2012-12-11 Last updated: 2015-01-30

Google changed the name to avoid confusion.

Problem with the old name fill parent was that it implies its affecting the dimensions of the parent, while match parent better describes the resulting behavior - match the dimension with the parent.

Both constants resolve to -1 in the end, and so result in the identical behavior in the app. Ironically enough, this name change made to clarify things seems to have added confusion rather than eliminating it.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#3: What is the difference between gravity and layout_gravity in Android? (Score: 1390)

Created: 2010-08-14 Last updated: 2019-02-12

Tags: android, android-layout, android-gravity

I know we can set the following values to the android:gravity and android:layout_gravity properties:

  1. center
  2. center_vertical
  3. center_horizontal, etc.

But I am confused regarding both of these.

What is the difference between the usage of android:gravity and android:layout_gravity?

#3 Best answer 1 of What is the difference between gravity and layout_gravity in Android? (Score: 1403)

Created: 2010-08-14 Last updated: 2019-02-08

Their names should help you:

  • android:gravity sets the gravity of the contents (i.e. its subviews) of the View it’s used on.
  • android:layout_gravity sets the gravity of the View or Layout relative to its parent.

And an example is here.

#3 Best answer 2 of What is the difference between gravity and layout_gravity in Android?(Score: 559)

Created: 2014-10-04 Last updated: 2017-05-23

Inside - Outside

  • gravity arranges the content inside the view.
  • layout_gravity arranges the view’s position outside of itself.

Sometimes it helps to see a picture, too. The green and blue are TextViews and the other two background colors are LinearLayouts.

enter image description here

#Notes

  • The layout_gravity does not work for views in a RelativeLayout. Use it for views in a LinearLayout or FrameLayout. See my supplemental answer for more details.
  • The view’s width (or height) has to be greater than its content. Otherwise gravity won’t have any effect. Thus, wrap_content and gravity are meaningless together.
  • The view’s width (or height) has to be less than the parent. Otherwise layout_gravity won’t have any effect. Thus, match_parent and layout_gravity are meaningless together.
  • The layout_gravity=center looks the same as layout_gravity=center_horizontal here because they are in a vertical linear layout. You can’t center vertically in this case, so layout_gravity=center only centers horizontally.
  • This answer only dealt with setting gravity and layout_gravity on the views within a layout. To see what happens when you set the gravity of the of the parent layout itself, check out the supplemental answer that I referred to above. (Summary: gravity doesn’t work well on a RelativeLayout but can be useful with a LinearLayout.)

So remember, layout_gravity arranges a view in its layout. Gravity arranges the content inside the view.

#xml

Here is the xml for the above image for your reference:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <LinearLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="0dp"
        android:layout_weight="1"
        android:background="#e3e2ad"
        android:orientation="vertical" >

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal"
            android:textSize="24sp"
            android:text="gravity=" />

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="200dp"
            android:layout_height="40dp"
            android:background="#bcf5b1"
            android:gravity="left"
            android:text="left" />

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="200dp"
            android:layout_height="40dp"
            android:background="#aacaff"
            android:gravity="center_horizontal"
            android:text="center_horizontal" />

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="200dp"
            android:layout_height="40dp"
            android:background="#bcf5b1"
            android:gravity="right"
            android:text="right" />

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="200dp"
            android:layout_height="40dp"
            android:background="#aacaff"
            android:gravity="center"
            android:text="center" />

    </LinearLayout>

    <LinearLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="0dp"
        android:layout_weight="1"
        android:background="#d6c6cd"
        android:orientation="vertical" >

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal"
            android:textSize="24sp"
            android:text="layout_gravity=" />

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="200dp"
            android:layout_height="40dp"
            android:layout_gravity="left"
            android:background="#bcf5b1"
            android:text="left" />

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="200dp"
            android:layout_height="40dp"
            android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal"
            android:background="#aacaff"
            android:text="center_horizontal" />

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="200dp"
            android:layout_height="40dp"
            android:layout_gravity="right"
            android:background="#bcf5b1"
            android:text="right" />

        <TextView
            android:layout_width="200dp"
            android:layout_height="40dp"
            android:layout_gravity="center"
            android:background="#aacaff"
            android:text="center" />

    </LinearLayout>

</LinearLayout>

#Related

See also original question in stackoverflow

#4: You need to use a Theme.AppCompat theme (or descendant) with this activity (Score: 1086)

Created: 2014-02-16 Last updated: 2020-01-20

Tags: android, android-layout

Android Studio 0.4.5

Android documentation for creating custom dialog boxes: http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/dialogs.html

If you want a custom dialog, you can instead display an Activity as a dialog instead of using the Dialog APIs. Simply create an activity and set its theme to Theme.Holo.Dialog in the <activity> manifest element:

<activity android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Holo.Dialog" >

However, when I tried this I get the following exception:

java.lang.IllegalStateException: You need to use a Theme.AppCompat theme (or descendant) with this activity

I am supporting the following, and I can’t using something greater than 10 for the min:

minSdkVersion 10
targetSdkVersion 19

In my styles I have the following:

<!-- Base application theme. -->
    <style name="AppTheme" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Light.DarkActionBar">

And in my manifest I have this for the activity:

 <application
        android:allowBackup="true"
        android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
        android:label="@string/app_name"
        android:theme="@style/AppTheme" >
        <activity
            android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Holo.Light.Dialog"
            android:name="com.ssd.register.Dialog_update"
            android:label="@string/title_activity_dialog_update" >
        </activity>

Creating the dialog box like this was something I was hopping to do, as I have already completed the layout.

Can anyone tell me how I can get around this problem?

#4 Best answer 1 of You need to use a Theme.AppCompat theme (or descendant) with this activity (Score: 1161)

Created: 2014-02-16 Last updated: 2017-06-13

The reason you are having this problem is because the activity you are trying to apply the dialog theme to is extending ActionBarActivity which requires the AppCompat theme to be applied.

Update: Extending AppCompatActivity would also have this problem

In this case, change the Java inheritance from ActionBarActivity to Activity and leave the dialog theme in the manifest as it is, a non Theme.AppCompat value


The general rule is that if you want your code to support older versions of Android, it should have the AppCompat theme and the java code should extend AppCompatActivity. If you have *an activity that doesn’t need this support, such as you only care about the latest versions and features of Android, you can apply any theme to it but the java code must extend plain old Activity.


NOTE: When change from AppCompatActivity (or a subclass, ActionBarActivity), to Activity, must also change the various calls with “support” to the corresponding call without “support”. So, instead of getSupportFragmentManager, call getFragmentManager.

#4 Best answer 2 of You need to use a Theme.AppCompat theme (or descendant) with this activity(Score: 572)

Created: 2014-09-04 Last updated: 2014-09-04

All you need to do is add android:theme="@style/Theme.AppCompat.Light" to your application tag in the AndroidManifest.xml file.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#5: What's "tools:context" in Android layout files? (Score: 976)

Created: 2012-06-18 Last updated: 2016-09-20

Tags: android, xml, android-layout, android-context, android-tools-namespace

Starting with a recent new version of ADT, I’ve noticed this new attribute on the layout XML files, for example:

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent"
    tools:context=".MainActivity" />

What is “tools:context” used for?

How does it even know the exact path to the activity that is written there? Does it look at the package of the app, inside the manifest?

Is it limited to classes that extend Context or only activities? Is it usable for ListView items etc.?

#5 Best answer 1 of What's "tools:context" in Android layout files? (Score: 466)

Created: 2012-06-18 Last updated: 2019-02-18

This is the activity the tools UI editor uses to render your layout preview. It is documented here:

This attribute declares which activity this layout is associated with by default. This enables features in the editor or layout preview that require knowledge of the activity, such as what the layout theme should be in the preview and where to insert onClick handlers when you make those from a quickfix

#5 Best answer 2 of What's "tools:context" in Android layout files?(Score: 386)

Created: 2012-06-19 Last updated: 2015-08-21

That attribute is basically the persistence for the “Associated Activity” selection above the layout. At runtime, a layout is always associated with an activity. It can of course be associated with more than one, but at least one. In the tool, we need to know about this mapping (which at runtime happens in the other direction; an activity can call setContentView(layout) to display a layout) in order to drive certain features.

Right now, we’re using it for one thing only: Picking the right theme to show for a layout (since the manifest file can register themes to use for an activity, and once we know the activity associated with the layout, we can pick the right theme to show for the layout). In the future, we’ll use this to drive additional features - such as rendering the action bar (which is associated with the activity), a place to add onClick handlers, etc.

The reason this is a tools: namespace attribute is that this is only a designtime mapping for use by the tool. The layout itself can be used by multiple activities/fragments etc. We just want to give you a way to pick a designtime binding such that we can for example show the right theme; you can change it at any time, just like you can change our listview and fragment bindings, etc.

(Here’s the full changeset which has more details on this)

And yeah, the link Nikolay listed above shows how the new configuration chooser looks and works

One more thing: The “tools” namespace is special. The android packaging tool knows to ignore it, so none of those attributes will be packaged into the APK. We’re using it for extra metadata in the layout. It’s also where for example the attributes to suppress lint warnings are stored – as tools:ignore.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#6: How to hide the title bar for an Activity in XML with existing custom theme (Score: 908)

Created: 2010-04-07 Last updated: 2018-07-12

Tags: android, android-layout, titlebar

I want to hide the titlebar for some of my activities. The problem is that I applied a style to all my activities, therefore I can’t simply set the theme to @android:style/Theme.NoTitleBar.

Using the NoTitleBar theme as a parent for my style would remove the title bar from all of my activities.

Can I set a no title style item somewhere?

#6 Best answer 1 of How to hide the title bar for an Activity in XML with existing custom theme (Score: 1079)

Created: 2010-04-07 Last updated: 2015-04-24

Do this in your onCreate() method.

//Remove title bar
this.requestWindowFeature(Window.FEATURE_NO_TITLE);
    
//Remove notification bar
this.getWindow().setFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_FULLSCREEN, WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_FULLSCREEN);

//set content view AFTER ABOVE sequence (to avoid crash)
this.setContentView(R.layout.your_layout_name_here); 

this refers to the Activity.

#6 Best answer 2 of How to hide the title bar for an Activity in XML with existing custom theme(Score: 536)

Created: 2010-09-20 Last updated: 2017-12-05

You can modify your AndroidManifest.xml:

<activity android:name=".MainActivity"
          android:label="@string/app_name"
          android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Black.NoTitleBar.Fullscreen">

or use android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Black.NoTitleBar" if you don’t need a fullscreen Activity.

Note: If you’ve used a ‘default’ view before, you probably should also change the parent class from AppCompatActivity to Activity.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#7: How to change fontFamily of TextView in Android (Score: 774)

Created: 2012-08-26 Last updated: 2016-08-02

Tags: android, android-layout, textview, typeface

So I’d like to change the android:fontFamily in Android but I don’t see any pre-defined fonts in Android. How do I select one of the pre-defined ones? I don’t really need to define my own TypeFace but all I need is something different from what it shows right now.

<TextView
    android:id="@+id/HeaderText"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_alignParentTop="true"
    android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
    android:layout_marginTop="52dp"
    android:gravity="center"
    android:text="CallerBlocker"
    android:textSize="40dp"
    android:fontFamily="Arial"
 />

It seems what I did up there won’t really work! BTW android:fontFamily="Arial" was a stupid attempt!

#7 Best answer 1 of How to change fontFamily of TextView in Android (Score: 1700)

Created: 2012-11-11 Last updated: 2016-10-18

From android 4.1 / 4.2 / 5.0, the following Roboto font families are available:

android:fontFamily="sans-serif"           // roboto regular
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-light"     // roboto light
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-condensed" // roboto condensed
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-black"     // roboto black
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-thin"      // roboto thin (android 4.2)
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-medium"    // roboto medium (android 5.0)

enter image description here

in combination with

android:textStyle="normal|bold|italic"

this 16 variants are possible:

  • Roboto regular
  • Roboto italic
  • Roboto bold
  • Roboto bold italic
  • Roboto-Light
  • Roboto-Light italic
  • Roboto-Thin
  • Roboto-Thin italic
  • Roboto-Condensed
  • Roboto-Condensed italic
  • Roboto-Condensed bold
  • Roboto-Condensed bold italic
  • Roboto-Black
  • Roboto-Black italic
  • Roboto-Medium
  • Roboto-Medium italic

fonts.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <string name="font_family_light">sans-serif-light</string>
    <string name="font_family_medium">sans-serif-medium</string>
    <string name="font_family_regular">sans-serif</string>
    <string name="font_family_condensed">sans-serif-condensed</string>
    <string name="font_family_black">sans-serif-black</string>
    <string name="font_family_thin">sans-serif-thin</string>
</resources>

#7 Best answer 2 of How to change fontFamily of TextView in Android(Score: 229)

Created: 2012-08-26 Last updated: 2017-05-23

This is the way to set the font programmatically:

TextView tv = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.appname);
Typeface face = Typeface.createFromAsset(getAssets(),
            "fonts/epimodem.ttf");
tv.setTypeface(face);

put the font file in your assets folder. In my case I created a subdirectory called fonts.

EDIT: If you wonder where is your assets folder see this question

See also original question in stackoverflow

#8: How do I put a border around an Android textview? (Score: 757)

Created: 2010-08-16 Last updated: 2021-03-24

Tags: android, android-layout, textview, android-shapedrawable

Is it possible to draw a border around a textview?

#8 Best answer 1 of How do I put a border around an Android textview? (Score: 1338)

Created: 2010-08-16 Last updated: 2017-04-03

You can set a shape drawable (a rectangle) as background for the view.

<TextView android:text="Some text" android:background="@drawable/back"/>

And rectangle drawable back.xml (put into res/drawable folder):

<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" android:shape="rectangle" >
   <solid android:color="@android:color/white" />
   <stroke android:width="1dip" android:color="#4fa5d5"/>
</shape>

You can use @android:color/transparent for the solid color to have a transparent background. You can also use padding to separate the text from the border. for more information see: http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/resources/drawable-resource.html

#8 Best answer 2 of How do I put a border around an Android textview?(Score: 210)

Created: 2015-04-04 Last updated: 2017-05-23

Let me summarize a few different (non-programmatic) methods.

Using a shape drawable

Save the following as an XML file in your drawable folder (for example, my_border.xml):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:shape="rectangle" >

    <!-- View background color -->
    <solid
        android:color="@color/background_color" >
    </solid>

    <!-- View border color and width -->
    <stroke
        android:width="1dp"
        android:color="@color/border_color" >
    </stroke>

    <!-- The radius makes the corners rounded -->
    <corners
        android:radius="2dp"   >
    </corners>

</shape>

Then just set it as the background to your TextView:

<TextView
    android:id="@+id/textview1"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:background="@drawable/my_border" />

More help:

Using a 9-patch

A 9-patch is a stretchable background image. If you make an image with a border then it will give your TextView a border. All you need to do is make the image and then set it to the background in your TextView.

<TextView
    android:id="@+id/textview1"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:background="@drawable/my_ninepatch_image" />

Here are some links that will show how to make a 9-patch image:

What if I just want the top border?

Using a layer-list

You can use a layer list to stack two rectangles on top of each other. By making the second rectangle just a little smaller than the first rectangle, you can make a border effect. The first (lower) rectangle is the border color and the second rectangle is the background color.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<layer-list xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

    <!-- Lower rectangle (border color) -->
    <item>
        <shape android:shape="rectangle">
            <solid android:color="@color/border_color" />
        </shape>
    </item>

    <!-- Upper rectangle (background color) -->
    <item android:top="2dp">
        <shape android:shape="rectangle">
            <solid android:color="@color/background_color" />
        </shape>
    </item>
</layer-list>

Setting android:top="2dp" offsets the top (makes it smaller) by 2dp. This allows the first (lower) rectangle to show through, giving a border effect. You can apply this to the TextView background the same way that the shape drawable was done above.

Here are some more links about layer lists:

Using a 9-patch

You can just make a 9-patch image with a single border. Everything else is the same as discussed above.

Using a View

This is kind of a trick but it works well if you need to add a seperator between two views or a border to a single TextView.

<LinearLayout
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textview1"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

    <!-- This adds a border between the TextViews -->
    <View
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="2dp"
        android:background="@android:color/black" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textview2"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

</LinearLayout>

Here are some more links:

See also original question in stackoverflow

#9: Standard Android Button with a different color (Score: 742)

Created: 2009-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-30

Tags: android, android-layout

I’d like to change the color of a standard Android button slightly in order to better match a client’s branding.

The best way I’ve found to do this so far is to change the Button’s drawable to the drawable located in res/drawable/red_button.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>    
<selector xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
    <item android:state_pressed="true" android:drawable="@drawable/red_button_pressed" />
    <item android:state_focused="true" android:drawable="@drawable/red_button_focus" />
    <item android:drawable="@drawable/red_button_rest" />
</selector>

But doing that requires that I actually create three different drawables for each button I want to customize (one for the button at rest, one when focused, and one when pressed). That seems more complicated and non-DRY than I need.

All I really want to do is apply some sort of color transform to the button. Is there an easier way to go about changing a button’s color than I’m doing?

#9 Best answer 1 of Standard Android Button with a different color (Score: 733)

Created: 2009-11-13 Last updated: 2010-07-22

I discovered that this can all be done in one file fairly easily. Put something like the following code in a file named custom_button.xml and then set background="@drawable/custom_button" in your button view:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<selector
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

    <item android:state_pressed="true" >
        <shape>
            <gradient
                android:startColor="@color/yellow1"
                android:endColor="@color/yellow2"
                android:angle="270" />
            <stroke
                android:width="3dp"
                android:color="@color/grey05" />
            <corners
                android:radius="3dp" />
            <padding
                android:left="10dp"
                android:top="10dp"
                android:right="10dp"
                android:bottom="10dp" />
        </shape>
    </item>
    
    <item android:state_focused="true" >
        <shape>
            <gradient
                android:endColor="@color/orange4"
                android:startColor="@color/orange5"
                android:angle="270" />
            <stroke
                android:width="3dp"
                android:color="@color/grey05" />
            <corners
                android:radius="3dp" />
            <padding
                android:left="10dp"
                android:top="10dp"
                android:right="10dp"
                android:bottom="10dp" />
        </shape>
    </item>

    <item>        
        <shape>
            <gradient
                android:endColor="@color/blue2"
                android:startColor="@color/blue25"
                android:angle="270" />
            <stroke
                android:width="3dp"
                android:color="@color/grey05" />
            <corners
                android:radius="3dp" />
            <padding
                android:left="10dp"
                android:top="10dp"
                android:right="10dp"
                android:bottom="10dp" />
        </shape>
    </item>
</selector>

#9 Best answer 2 of Standard Android Button with a different color(Score: 310)

Created: 2010-08-15 Last updated: 2010-08-15

Following on from Tomasz’s answer, you can also programmatically set the shade of the entire button using the PorterDuff multiply mode. This will change the button colour rather than just the tint.

If you start with a standard grey shaded button:

button.getBackground().setColorFilter(0xFFFF0000, PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLY);

will give you a red shaded button,

button.getBackground().setColorFilter(0xFF00FF00, PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLY);

will give you a green shaded button etc., where the first value is the colour in hex format.

It works by multiplying the current button colour value by your colour value. I’m sure there’s also a lot more you can do with these modes.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#10: Can I underline text in an Android layout? (Score: 734)

Created: 2010-03-07 Last updated: 2018-10-11

Tags: android, android-layout, fonts

How can I define underlined text in an Android layout xml file?

#10 Best answer 1 of Can I underline text in an Android layout? (Score: 1224)

Created: 2010-03-07 Last updated: 2017-10-25

It can be achieved if you are using a string resource xml file, which supports HTML tags like <b></b>, <i></i> and <u></u>.

<resources>
    <string name="your_string_here">This is an <u>underline</u>.</string>
</resources>

If you want to underline something from code use:

TextView textView = (TextView) view.findViewById(R.id.textview);
SpannableString content = new SpannableString("Content");
content.setSpan(new UnderlineSpan(), 0, content.length(), 0);
textView.setText(content);

#10 Best answer 2 of Can I underline text in an Android layout?(Score: 564)

Created: 2012-06-08 Last updated: 2012-06-28

You can try with

textview.setPaintFlags(textview.getPaintFlags() |   Paint.UNDERLINE_TEXT_FLAG);

See also original question in stackoverflow


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