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Most votes on android-layout questions 2

Most votes on android-layout questions 2. #11 What does android:layout_weight mean? #12 How do I align views at the bottom of the screen? #13 Can the Android layout folder contain subfolders? #14 View's getWidth() and getHeight() returns 0 #15 Why fragments, and when to use fragments instead of activities? #16 How to programmatically set drawableLeft on Android button? #17 How do I get the currently displayed fragment? #18 Percentage width in a RelativeLayout #19 How do I remove lines between ListViews on Android? #20 android:drawableLeft margin and/or padding

Read all the top votes questions and answers in a single page.

#11: What does android:layout_weight mean? (Score: 662)

Created: 2010-10-22 Last updated: 2012-01-03

Tags: android, android-layout, android-widget

I don’t understand how to use this attribute. Can anyone tell me more about it?

#11 Best answer 1 of What does android:layout_weight mean? (Score: 874)

Created: 2010-10-22 Last updated: 2017-11-05

With layout_weight you can specify a size ratio between multiple views. E.g. you have a MapView and a table which should show some additional information to the map. The map should use 3/4 of the screen and table should use 1/4 of the screen. Then you will set the layout_weight of the map to 3 and the layout_weight of the table to 1.

To get it work you also have to set the height or width (depending on your orientation) to 0px.

#11 Best answer 2 of What does android:layout_weight mean?(Score: 254)

Created: 2010-10-22 Last updated: 2021-02-22

In a nutshell, layout_weight specifies how much of the extra space in the layout to be allocated to the View.

LinearLayout supports assigning a weight to individual children. This attribute assigns an “importance” value to a view, and allows it to expand to fill any remaining space in the parent view. Views' default weight is zero.

Calculation to assign any remaining space between child

In general, the formula is:

space assigned to child = (child’s individual weight) / (sum of weight of every child in Linear Layout)

Example 1

If there are three text boxes and two of them declare a weight of 1, while the third one is given no weight (0), then remaining space is assigned as follows:

1st text box = 1/(1+1+0)

2nd text box = 1/(1+1+0)

3rd text box = 0/(1+1+0)

Example 2

Let’s say we have a text label and two text edit elements in a horizontal row. The label has no layout_weight specified, so it takes up the minimum space required to render. If the layout_weight of each of the two text edit elements is set to 1, the remaining width in the parent layout will be split equally between them (because we claim they are equally important).

Calculation:

1st label = 0/(0+1+1)

2nd text box = 1/(0+1+1)

3rd text box = 1/(0+1+1)

If, instead, the first one text box has a layout_weight of 1, and the second text box has a layout_weight of 2, then one third of the remaining space will be given to the first, and two thirds to the second (because we claim the second one is more important).

Calculation:

1st label = 0/(0+1+2)

2nd text box = 1/(0+1+2)

3rd text box = 2/(0+1+2)


Source article

See also original question in stackoverflow

#12: How do I align views at the bottom of the screen? (Score: 656)

Created: 2010-03-05 Last updated: 2019-09-24

Tags: android, xml, user-interface, android-layout

Here’s my layout code;

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent">

    <TextView android:text="@string/welcome"
        android:id="@+id/TextView"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content">
    </TextView>

    <LinearLayout android:id="@+id/LinearLayout"
        android:orientation="horizontal"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:gravity="bottom">

            <EditText android:id="@+id/EditText"
                android:layout_width="fill_parent"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content">
            </EditText>

            <Button android:text="@string/label_submit_button"
                android:id="@+id/Button"
                android:layout_width="wrap_content"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content">
            </Button>

    </LinearLayout>

</LinearLayout>

What this looks like is on the left and what I want it to look like is on the right.

Android Layout - Actual (Left) and Desired (Right)

The obvious answer is to set the TextView to fill_parent on height, but this causes no room to be left for the button or entry field.

Essentially the issue is that I want the submit button and the text entry to be a fixed height at the bottom and the text view to fill the rest of the space. Similarly, in the horizontal linear layout I want the submit button to wrap its content and for the text entry to fill the rest of the space.

If the first item in a linear layout is told to fill_parent it does exactly that, leaving no room for other items. How do I get an item which is first in a linear layout to fill all space apart from the minimum required by the rest of the items in the layout?


Relative layouts were indeed the answer:

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
    <RelativeLayout
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent">

    <TextView
        android:text="@string/welcome"
        android:id="@+id/TextView"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignParentTop="true">
    </TextView>

    <RelativeLayout
        android:id="@+id/InnerRelativeLayout"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignParentBottom="true" >

        <Button
            android:text="@string/label_submit_button"
            android:id="@+id/Button"
            android:layout_alignParentRight="true"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content">
        </Button>

        <EditText
            android:id="@+id/EditText"
            android:layout_width="fill_parent"
            android:layout_toLeftOf="@id/Button"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content">
        </EditText>

    </RelativeLayout>

</RelativeLayout>

#12 Best answer 1 of How do I align views at the bottom of the screen? (Score: 539)

Created: 2010-03-05 Last updated: 2019-09-24

The modern way to do this is to have a ConstraintLayout and constrain the bottom of the view to the bottom of the ConstraintLayout with app:layout_constraintBottom_toBottomOf="parent"

The example below creates a FloatingActionButton that will be aligned to the end and the bottom of the screen.

<android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout
   xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
   xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
   xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
   android:layout_height="match_parent"
   android:layout_width="match_parent">

<android.support.design.widget.FloatingActionButton
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"

    app:layout_constraintBottom_toBottomOf="parent"

    app:layout_constraintEnd_toEndOf="parent" />

</android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout>

For reference, I will keep my old answer.

Before the introduction of ConstraintLayout the answer was a relative layout.


If you have a relative layout that fills the whole screen you should be able to use android:layout_alignParentBottom to move the button to the bottom of the screen.

If your views at the bottom are not shown in a relative layout then maybe the layout above it takes all the space. In this case you can put the view, that should be at the bottom, first in your layout file and position the rest of the layout above the views with android:layout_above. This enables the bottom view to take as much space as it needs, and the rest of the layout can fill all the rest of the screen.

#12 Best answer 2 of How do I align views at the bottom of the screen?(Score: 157)

Created: 2010-11-04 Last updated: 2016-03-01

In a ScrollView this doesn’t work, as the RelativeLayout would then overlap whatever is in the ScrollView at the bottom of the page.

I fixed it using a dynamically stretching FrameLayout :

<ScrollView 
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
	android:layout_height="match_parent" 
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:fillViewport="true">
	<LinearLayout 
        android:id="@+id/LinearLayout01"
        android:layout_width="match_parent" 
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
        android:orientation="vertical">

                <!-- content goes here -->

                <!-- stretching frame layout, using layout_weight -->
        <FrameLayout
            android:layout_width="match_parent" 
            android:layout_height="0dp"
            android:layout_weight="1">
        </FrameLayout>

                <!-- content fixated to the bottom of the screen -->
        <LinearLayout 
            android:layout_width="match_parent" 
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:orientation="horizontal">
                                   <!-- your bottom content -->
        </LinearLayout>
	</LinearLayout>
</ScrollView>

See also original question in stackoverflow

#13: Can the Android layout folder contain subfolders? (Score: 592)

Created: 2011-02-08 Last updated: 2020-08-20

Tags: android, xml, android-layout, gradle, build.gradle

Right now, I’m storing every XML layout file inside the ‘res/layout’ folder, so it is feasible and simple to manage small projects, but when there is a case of large and heavy projects, then there should be a hierarchy and sub-folders needed inside the layout folder.

for e.g.

layout
-- layout_personal
   -- personal_detail.xml
   -- personal_other.xml
--layout_address
  -- address1.xml
  -- address2.xml

Like the same way, we would like to have sub-folders for the large application, so is there any way to do so inside the Android project?

I am able to create layout-personal and layout_address sub-folders inside the layout folder, but when the time comes to access the XML layout file using R.layout._______ , at that time there is no any XML layout pop-up inside the menu.

#13 Best answer 1 of Can the Android layout folder contain subfolders? (Score: 506)

Created: 2014-03-15 Last updated: 2016-11-22

You CAN do this with gradle. I’ve made a demo project showing how.

The trick is to use gradle’s ability to merge multiple resource folders, and set the res folder as well as the nested subfolders in the sourceSets block.

The quirk is that you can’t declare a container resource folder before you declare that folder’s child resource folders.

Below is the sourceSets block from the build.gradle file from the demo. Notice that the subfolders are declared first.

sourceSets {
    main {
        res.srcDirs =
        [
                'src/main/res/layouts/layouts_category2',
                'src/main/res/layouts',
                'src/main/res'
        ]
    }
}

nested resources picture

Also, the direct parent of your actual resource files (pngs, xml layouts, etc..) does still need to correspond with the specification.

#13 Best answer 2 of Can the Android layout folder contain subfolders?(Score: 241)

Created: 2011-02-08 Last updated: 2012-06-21

The answer is no.

I would like to draw your attention towards this book Pro Android 2 that states:

It is also worth noting a few constraints regarding resources. First, Android supports only a linear list of files within the predefined folders under res. For example, it does not support nested folders under the layout folder (or the other folders under res).

Second, there are some similarities between the assets folder and the raw folder under res. Both folders can contain raw files, but the files within raw are considered resources and the files within assets are not.

Note that because the contents of the assets folder are not considered resources, you can put an arbitrary hierarchy of folders and files within it.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#14: View's getWidth() and getHeight() returns 0 (Score: 557)

Created: 2010-08-28 Last updated: 2017-12-08

Tags: java, android, android-layout, getter

I am creating all of the elements in my android project dynamically. I am trying to get the width and height of a button so that I can rotate that button around. I am just trying to learn how to work with the android language. However, it returns 0.

I did some research and I saw that it needs to be done somewhere other than in the onCreate() method. If someone can give me an example of how to do it, that would be great.

Here is my current code:

package com.animation;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.view.animation.Animation;
import android.view.animation.LinearInterpolator;
import android.view.animation.RotateAnimation;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.LinearLayout;

public class AnimateScreen extends Activity {


//Called when the activity is first created.
@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    
    LinearLayout ll = new LinearLayout(this);
    
    LinearLayout.LayoutParams layoutParams = new LinearLayout.LayoutParams(LinearLayout.LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT, LinearLayout.LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT);
    layoutParams.setMargins(30, 20, 30, 0);

    Button bt = new Button(this);
    bt.setText(String.valueOf(bt.getWidth()));
   
    RotateAnimation ra = new RotateAnimation(0,360,bt.getWidth() / 2,bt.getHeight() / 2);
    ra.setDuration(3000L);
    ra.setRepeatMode(Animation.RESTART);
    ra.setRepeatCount(Animation.INFINITE);
    ra.setInterpolator(new LinearInterpolator());

    bt.startAnimation(ra);
    
    ll.addView(bt,layoutParams);
    
    setContentView(ll);
}

Any help is appreciated.

#14 Best answer 1 of View's getWidth() and getHeight() returns 0 (Score: 889)

Created: 2014-06-04 Last updated: 2020-06-23

The basic problem is, that you have to wait for the drawing phase for the actual measurements (especially with dynamic values like wrap_content or match_parent), but usually this phase hasn’t been finished up to onResume(). So you need a workaround for waiting for this phase. There a are different possible solutions to this:

1. Listen to Draw/Layout Events: ViewTreeObserver

A ViewTreeObserver gets fired for different drawing events. Usually the OnGlobalLayoutListener is what you want for getting the measurement, so the code in the listener will be called after the layout phase, so the measurements are ready:

view.getViewTreeObserver().addOnGlobalLayoutListener(new ViewTreeObserver.OnGlobalLayoutListener() {
            @Override
            public void onGlobalLayout() {
                view.getViewTreeObserver().removeOnGlobalLayoutListener(this);
                view.getHeight(); //height is ready
            }
        });

Note: The listener will be immediately removed because otherwise it will fire on every layout event. If you have to support apps SDK Lvl < 16 use this to unregister the listener:

public void removeGlobalOnLayoutListener (ViewTreeObserver.OnGlobalLayoutListener victim)


2. Add a runnable to the layout queue: View.post()

Not very well known and my favourite solution. Basically just use the View’s post method with your own runnable. This basically queues your code after the view’s measure, layout, etc. as stated by Romain Guy:

The UI event queue will process events in order. After setContentView() is invoked, the event queue will contain a message asking for a relayout, so anything you post to the queue will happen after the layout pass

Example:

final View view=//smth;
...
view.post(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                view.getHeight(); //height is ready
            }
        });

The advantage over ViewTreeObserver:

  • your code is only executed once and you don’t have to disable the Observer after execution which can be a hassle
  • less verbose syntax

References:


3. Overwrite Views’s onLayout Method

This is only practical in certain situation when the logic can be encapsulated in the view itself, otherwise this is a quite verbose and cumbersome syntax.

view = new View(this) {
    @Override
    protected void onLayout(boolean changed, int l, int t, int r, int b) {
        super.onLayout(changed, l, t, r, b);
        view.getHeight(); //height is ready
    }
};

Also mind, that onLayout will be called many times, so be considerate what you do in the method, or disable your code after the first time


4. Check if has been through layout phase

If you have code that is executing multiple times while creating the ui you could use the following support v4 lib method:

View viewYouNeedHeightFrom = ...
...
if(ViewCompat.isLaidOut(viewYouNeedHeightFrom)) {
   viewYouNeedHeightFrom.getHeight();
}

Returns true if view has been through at least one layout since it was last attached to or detached from a window.

Additional: Getting staticly defined measurements

If it suffices to just get the statically defined height/width, you can just do this with:

But mind you, that this might be different to the actual width/height after drawing. The javadoc describes the difference in more detail:

The size of a view is expressed with a width and a height. A view actually possess two pairs of width and height values.

The first pair is known as measured width and measured height. These dimensions define how big a view wants to be within its parent (see Layout for more details.) The measured dimensions can be obtained by calling getMeasuredWidth() and getMeasuredHeight().

The second pair is simply known as width and height, or sometimes drawing width and drawing height. These dimensions define the actual size of the view on screen, at drawing time and after layout. These values may, but do not have to, be different from the measured width and height. The width and height can be obtained by calling getWidth() and getHeight().

#14 Best answer 2 of View's getWidth() and getHeight() returns 0(Score: 262)

Created: 2012-04-12 Last updated: 2016-02-08

We can use

@Override
 public void onWindowFocusChanged(boolean hasFocus) {
  super.onWindowFocusChanged(hasFocus);
  //Here you can get the size!
 }

See also original question in stackoverflow

#15: Why fragments, and when to use fragments instead of activities? (Score: 539)

Created: 2012-05-07 Last updated: 2018-12-04

Tags: android, android-layout, android-fragments, android-activity, android-3.0-honeycomb

In Android API 11+, Google has released a new class called Fragment.

In the videos, Google suggests that whenever possible (link1, link2), we should use fragments instead of activities, but they didn’t explain exactly why.

What’s the purpose of fragments and some possible uses of them (other than some UI examples that can be easily be achieved by simple views/layouts)?

My question is about fragments:

  1. What are the purposes of using a fragment?
  2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of using fragments compared to using activities/views/layouts?

Bonus questions:

  1. Can you give some really interesting uses for fragments? Things that Google didn’t mention in their videos?
  2. What’s the best way to communicate between fragments and the activities that contain them?
  3. What are the most important things to remember when you use fragments? Any tips and warnings from your experience?

#15 Best answer 1 of Why fragments, and when to use fragments instead of activities? (Score: 309)

Created: 2012-05-09 Last updated: 2020-02-17

#1 & #2 what are the purposes of using a fragment & what are the advantages and disadvantages of using fragments compared to using activities/views/layouts?

Fragments are Android’s solution to creating reusable user interfaces. You can achieve some of the same things using activities and layouts (for example by using includes). However; fragments are wired in to the Android API, from HoneyComb, and up. Let me elaborate;

  • The ActionBar. If you want tabs up there to navigate your app, you quickly see that ActionBar.TabListener interface gives you a FragmentTransaction as an input argument to the onTabSelected method. You could probably ignore this, and do something else and clever, but you’d be working against the API, not with it.

  • The FragmentManager handles «back» for you in a very clever way. Back does not mean back to the last activity, like for regular activities. It means back to the previous fragment state.

  • You can use the cool ViewPager with a FragmentPagerAdapter to create swipe interfaces. The FragmentPagerAdapter code is much cleaner than a regular adapter, and it controls instantiations of the individual fragments.

  • Your life will be a lot easier if you use Fragments when you try to create applications for both phones and tablets. Since the fragments are so tied in with the Honeycomb+ APIs, you will want to use them on phones as well to reuse code. That’s where the compatibility library comes in handy.

  • You even could and should use fragments for apps meant for phones only. If you have portability in mind. I use ActionBarSherlock and the compatibility libraries to create “ICS looking” apps, that look the same all the way back to version 1.6. You get the latest features like the ActionBar, with tabs, overflow, split action bar, viewpager etc.

Bonus 2

The best way to communicate between fragments are intents. When you press something in a Fragment you would typically call StartActivity() with data on it. The intent is passed on to all fragments of the activity you launch.

#15 Best answer 2 of Why fragments, and when to use fragments instead of activities?(Score: 74)

Created: 2012-05-07 Last updated: 2016-07-24

Not sure what video(s) you are referring to, but I doubt they are saying you should use fragments instead of activities, because they are not directly interchangeable. There is actually a fairly detailed entry in the Dev Guide, consider reading it for details.

In short, fragments live inside activities, and each activity can host many fragments. Like activities, they have a specific lifecycle, unlike activities, they are not top-level application components. Advantages of fragments include code reuse and modularity (e.g., using the same list view in many activities), including the ability to build multi-pane interfaces (mostly useful on tablets). The main disadvantage is (some) added complexity. You can generally achieve the same thing with (custom) views in a non-standard and less robust way.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#16: How to programmatically set drawableLeft on Android button? (Score: 488)

Created: 2010-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-24

Tags: java, android, android-layout, android-2.2-froyo

I’m dynamically creating buttons. I styled them using XML first, and I’m trying to take the XML below and make it programattic.

<Button
    android:id="@+id/buttonIdDoesntMatter"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:text="buttonName"
    android:drawableLeft="@drawable/imageWillChange"
    android:onClick="listener"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent">
</Button>

This is what I have so far. I can do everything but the drawable.

linear = (LinearLayout) findViewById(R.id.LinearView);
Button button = new Button(this);
button.setText("Button");
button.setOnClickListener(listener);
button.setLayoutParams(
    new LayoutParams(
        android.view.ViewGroup.LayoutParams.FILL_PARENT,         
        android.view.ViewGroup.LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT
	)
);		
		
linear.addView(button);

#16 Best answer 1 of How to programmatically set drawableLeft on Android button? (Score: 1142)

Created: 2010-12-21 Last updated: 2020-03-10

You can use the setCompoundDrawables method to do this. See the example here. I used this without using the setBounds and it worked. You can try either way.

UPDATE: Copying the code here incase the link goes down

Drawable img = getContext().getResources().getDrawable(R.drawable.smiley);
img.setBounds(0, 0, 60, 60);
txtVw.setCompoundDrawables(img, null, null, null);

or

Drawable img = getContext().getResources().getDrawable(R.drawable.smiley);
txtVw.setCompoundDrawablesWithIntrinsicBounds(img, null, null, null);

or

txtVw.setCompoundDrawablesWithIntrinsicBounds(R.drawable.smiley, 0, 0, 0);

#16 Best answer 2 of How to programmatically set drawableLeft on Android button?(Score: 111)

Created: 2013-07-29 Last updated: 2016-07-25

Simply you can try this also

txtVw.setCompoundDrawablesWithIntrinsicBounds(R.drawable.smiley, 0, 0, 0);

See also original question in stackoverflow

#17: How do I get the currently displayed fragment? (Score: 484)

Created: 2012-02-15 Last updated: 2018-12-18

Tags: android, android-layout, android-intent, android-fragments

I am playing with fragments in Android.

I know I can change a fragment by using the following code:

FragmentManager fragMgr = getSupportFragmentManager();
FragmentTransaction fragTrans = fragMgr.beginTransaction();

MyFragment myFragment = new MyFragment(); //my custom fragment

fragTrans.replace(android.R.id.content, myFragment);
fragTrans.addToBackStack(null);
fragTrans.setTransition(FragmentTransaction.TRANSIT_FRAGMENT_FADE);
fragTrans.commit();

My question is, in a Java file, how can I get the currently displayed Fragment instance?

#17 Best answer 1 of How do I get the currently displayed fragment? (Score: 478)

Created: 2012-02-15 Last updated: 2020-08-24

When you add the fragment in your transaction you should use a tag.

fragTrans.replace(android.R.id.content, myFragment, "MY_FRAGMENT");

…and later if you want to check if the fragment is visible:

MyFragment myFragment = (MyFragment)getSupportFragmentManager().findFragmentByTag("MY_FRAGMENT");
if (myFragment != null && myFragment.isVisible()) {
   // add your code here
}

See also http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Fragment.html

#17 Best answer 2 of How do I get the currently displayed fragment?(Score: 429)

Created: 2014-07-05 Last updated: 2018-03-28

I know it’s an old post, but was having trouble with it previously too. Found a solution which was to do this in the onBackStackChanged() listening function

  @Override
    public void onBackPressed() {
        super.onBackPressed();

         Fragment f = getActivity().getFragmentManager().findFragmentById(R.id.fragment_container);
      if(f instanceof CustomFragmentClass) 
        // do something with f
        ((CustomFragmentClass) f).doSomething();

    }

This worked for me as I didn’t want to iterate through every fragment I have to find one that is visible. Hope it helps someone else too.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#18: Percentage width in a RelativeLayout (Score: 465)

Created: 2011-02-10 Last updated: 2015-09-12

Tags: android, android-layout, android-relativelayout

I am working on a form layout for a Login Activity in my Android App. The image below is how I want it to look like:

enter image description here

I was able to achieve this layout with the following XML. The problem is, it’s a bit hackish. I had to hard-code a width for the host EditText. Specifically, I had to specify:

android:layout_width="172dp" 

I’d really like to give a percentage width to the host and port EditText’s . (Something like 80% for the host, 20% for the port.) Is this possible? The following XML works on my Droid, but it doesn’t seem to work for all screens. I would really like a more robust solution.

<!-- begin snippet: js hide: false -->

<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/main"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/host_label"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/home"
        android:paddingLeft="15dp"
        android:paddingTop="0dp"
        android:text="host"
        android:textColor="#a5d4e2"
        android:textSize="25sp"
        android:textStyle="normal" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/port_label"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/home"
        android:layout_toRightOf="@+id/host_input"
        android:paddingTop="0dp"
        android:text="port"
        android:textColor="#a5d4e2"
        android:textSize="25sp"
        android:textStyle="normal" />

    <EditText
        android:id="@+id/host_input"
        android:layout_width="172dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@id/host_label"
        android:layout_marginLeft="15dp"
        android:layout_marginRight="15dp"
        android:layout_marginTop="4dp"
        android:background="@android:drawable/editbox_background"
        android:inputType="textEmailAddress" />

    <EditText
        android:id="@+id/port_input"
        android:layout_width="100dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@id/host_label"
        android:layout_marginTop="4dp"
        android:layout_toRightOf="@id/host_input"
        android:background="@android:drawable/editbox_background"
        android:inputType="number" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/username_label"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/host_input"
        android:paddingLeft="15dp"
        android:paddingTop="15dp"
        android:text="username"
        android:textColor="#a5d4e2"
        android:textSize="25sp"
        android:textStyle="normal" />

    <EditText
        android:id="@+id/username_input"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@id/username_label"
        android:layout_marginLeft="15dp"
        android:layout_marginRight="15dp"
        android:layout_marginTop="4dp"
        android:background="@android:drawable/editbox_background"
        android:inputType="textEmailAddress" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/password_label"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/username_input"
        android:paddingLeft="15dp"
        android:paddingTop="15dp"
        android:text="password"
        android:textColor="#a5d4e2"
        android:textSize="25sp"
        android:textStyle="normal" />

    <EditText
        android:id="@+id/password_input"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@id/password_label"
        android:layout_marginLeft="15dp"
        android:layout_marginRight="15dp"
        android:layout_marginTop="4dp"
        android:background="@android:drawable/editbox_background"
        android:inputType="textPassword" />

    <ImageView
        android:id="@+id/home"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignParentTop="true"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_centerVertical="false"
        android:paddingLeft="15dp"
        android:paddingRight="15dp"
        android:paddingTop="15dp"
        android:scaleType="fitStart"
        android:src="@drawable/home" />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/login_button"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/password_input"
        android:layout_marginLeft="15dp"
        android:layout_marginTop="15dp"
        android:text="   login   "
        android:textSize="18sp" >
    </Button>

</RelativeLayout>

<!-- end snippet -->

#18 Best answer 1 of Percentage width in a RelativeLayout (Score: 795)

Created: 2011-02-10 Last updated: 2016-10-07

You are looking for the android:layout_weight attribute. It will allow you to use percentages to define your layout.

In the following example, the left button uses 70% of the space, and the right button 30%.

<LinearLayout
    android:layout_width="match_parent" 
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:orientation="horizontal">

    <Button
        android:text="left" 
        android:layout_width="0dp" 
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" 
        android:layout_weight=".70" /> 

    <Button
        android:text="right" 
        android:layout_width="0dp" 
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" 
        android:layout_weight=".30" />

</LinearLayout>

It works the same with any kind of View, you can replace the buttons with some EditText to fit your needs.

Be sure to set the layout_width to 0dp or your views may not be scaled properly.

Note that the weight sum doesn’t have to equal 1, I just find it easier to read like this. You can set the first weight to 7 and the second to 3 and it will give the same result.

#18 Best answer 2 of Percentage width in a RelativeLayout(Score: 292)

Created: 2011-10-16 Last updated: 2013-09-23

This does not quite answer the original question, which was for a 70/30 split, but in the special case of a 50/50 split between the components there is a way: place an invisible strut at the center and use it to position the two components of interest.

<RelativeLayout 
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content">
    <View android:id="@+id/strut"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="0dp" 
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"/>
    <Button
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignRight="@id/strut"
        android:layout_alignParentLeft="true"
        android:text="Left"/> 
    <Button 
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignLeft="@id/strut"
        android:layout_alignParentRight="true"
        android:text="Right"/>
</RelativeLayout>

As this is a pretty common case, this solution is more than a curiosity. It is a bit of a hack but an efficient one because the empty, zero-sized strut should cost very little.

In general, though, it’s best not to expect too much from the stock Android layouts…

See also original question in stackoverflow

#19: How do I remove lines between ListViews on Android? (Score: 415)

Created: 2009-12-16 Last updated: 2017-01-20

Tags: android, android-layout, listview

I’m using two ListViews like this:

<ListView
   android:id="@+id/ListView"
   android:text="@string/Website"
   android:layout_height="30px"
   android:layout_width="150px"
   android:scrollbars="none"
   android:transcriptMode="normal"/>
<ListView
   android:id="@+id/ListView1"
   android:text="@string/Website"
   android:layout_height="30px"
   android:layout_width="150px"
   android:scrollbars="none"
   android:transcriptMode="normal"/>

There is one blank line between the two ListViews. How do I remove it?

#19 Best answer 1 of How do I remove lines between ListViews on Android? (Score: 951)

Created: 2009-12-16 Last updated: 2011-05-03

To remove the separator between items in the same ListView, here is the solution:

getListView().setDivider(null);
getListView().setDividerHeight(0);

developer.android.com # ListView

Or, if you want to do it in XML:

android:divider="@null"
android:dividerHeight="0dp"

#19 Best answer 2 of How do I remove lines between ListViews on Android?(Score: 97)

Created: 2013-12-30 Last updated: 2016-08-07

  1. If you want to remove a divider line, use this code:

     android:divider="@null"
    
  2. If you want to add a space instead of a divider line:

     android:divider="@android:color/transparent"
     android:dividerHeight="5dp"
    

So, you can use any drawable or color in the divider attribute.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#20: android:drawableLeft margin and/or padding (Score: 408)

Created: 2010-07-26 Last updated: 2015-08-10

Tags: android, android-layout, android-drawable

Is it possible to set the margin or padding for the image which we added with the android:drawableLeft?

#20 Best answer 1 of android:drawableLeft margin and/or padding (Score: 489)

Created: 2011-07-12

As cephus mentioned android:drawablePadding will only force padding between the text and the drawable if the button is small enough.

When laying out larger buttons you can use android:drawablePadding in conjunction with android:paddingLeft and android:paddingRight to force the text and drawable inward towards the center of the button. By adjusting the left and right padding separately you can make very detailed adjustments to the layout.

Here’s an example button that uses padding to push the text and icon closer together than they would be by default:

<Button android:text="@string/button_label" 
    android:id="@+id/buttonId"
    android:layout_width="160dip"
    android:layout_height="60dip"
    android:layout_gravity="center"
    android:textSize="13dip"
    android:drawableLeft="@drawable/button_icon"
    android:drawablePadding="2dip"
    android:paddingLeft="30dip"
    android:paddingRight="26dip"
    android:singleLine="true"
    android:gravity="center" />  

#20 Best answer 2 of android:drawableLeft margin and/or padding(Score: 195)

Created: 2010-07-26 Last updated: 2014-05-26

TextView has an android:drawablePadding property which should do the trick:

android:drawablePadding

The padding between the drawables and the text.

Must be a dimension value, which is a floating point number appended with a unit such as “14.5sp”. Available units are: px (pixels), dp (density-independent pixels), sp (scaled pixels based on preferred font size), in (inches), mm (millimeters).

This may also be a reference to a resource (in the form “@[package:]type:name”) or theme attribute (in the form “?[package:][type:]name”) containing a value of this type.

This corresponds to the global attribute resource symbol drawablePadding.

See also original question in stackoverflow


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