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Most votes on android-layout questions 7

Most votes on android-layout questions 7. #61 How to make layout with View fill the remaining space? #62 Set android shape color programmatically #63 How to implement a ViewPager with different Fragments / Layouts #64 Evenly spacing views using ConstraintLayout #65 Android Paint: .measureText() vs .getTextBounds() #66 Getting activity from context in android #67 How do I make WRAP_CONTENT work on a RecyclerView #68 String Resource new line /n not possible? #69 How to adjust layout when soft keyboard appears #70 Android: ScrollView vs NestedScrollView

Read all the top votes questions and answers in a single page.

#61: How to make layout with View fill the remaining space? (Score: 199)

Created: 2011-06-11 Last updated: 2015-12-30

Tags: android, layout, android-layout

I’m designing my application UI. I need a layout looks like this:

Example of desired layout

(< and > are Buttons). The problem is, I don’t know how to make sure the TextView will fill the remaining space, with two buttons have fixed size.

If I use fill_parent for Text View, the second button (>) can’t be shown.

How can I craft a layout that looks like the image?

#61 Best answer 1 of How to make layout with View fill the remaining space? (Score: 226)

Created: 2014-09-11 Last updated: 2014-09-11

Answer from woodshy worked for me, and it is simpler than the answer by Ungureanu Liviu since it does not use RelativeLayout. I am giving my layout for clarity:

<LinearLayout 
      android:layout_width="fill_parent"
      android:layout_height="wrap_content"
      android:orientation="horizontal"
      >

     <Button
        android:layout_width = "80dp"
        android:layout_weight = "0"
        android:layout_height = "wrap_content"
        android:text="&lt;"/>
     <TextView
        android:layout_width = "fill_parent"
        android:layout_height = "wrap_content"
        android:layout_weight = "1"/>
     <Button
        android:layout_width = "80dp"
        android:layout_weight = "0"
        android:layout_height = "wrap_content"
        android:text="&gt;"/>   
 </LinearLayout>

#61 Best answer 2 of How to make layout with View fill the remaining space?(Score: 94)

Created: 2011-06-11 Last updated: 2015-06-20

In case if < TEXT VIEW > is placed in LinearLayout, set the Layout_weight proprty of < and > to 0 and 1 for TextView.
In case of RelativeLayout align < and > to left and right and set “Layout to left of” and “Layout to right of” property of TextView to ids of < and >

See also original question in stackoverflow

#62: Set android shape color programmatically (Score: 194)

Created: 2013-07-24 Last updated: 2014-02-04

Tags: android, android-layout, shape

I am editing to make the question simpler, hoping that helps towards an accurate answer.

Say I have the following oval shape:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" android:shape="oval">
    <solid android:angle="270"
           android:color="#FFFF0000"/>
    <stroke android:width="3dp"
            android:color="#FFAA0055"/>
</shape>

How do I set the color programmatically, from within an activity class?

#62 Best answer 1 of Set android shape color programmatically (Score: 281)

Created: 2013-07-24 Last updated: 2017-05-23

Note: Answer has been updated to cover the scenario where background is an instance of ColorDrawable. Thanks Tyler Pfaff, for pointing this out.

The drawable is an oval and is the background of an ImageView

Get the Drawable from imageView using getBackground():

Drawable background = imageView.getBackground();

Check against usual suspects:

if (background instanceof ShapeDrawable) {
    // cast to 'ShapeDrawable'
    ShapeDrawable shapeDrawable = (ShapeDrawable) background;
    shapeDrawable.getPaint().setColor(ContextCompat.getColor(mContext,R.color.colorToSet));
} else if (background instanceof GradientDrawable) {
    // cast to 'GradientDrawable'
    GradientDrawable gradientDrawable = (GradientDrawable) background;
    gradientDrawable.setColor(ContextCompat.getColor(mContext,R.color.colorToSet));
} else if (background instanceof ColorDrawable) {
    // alpha value may need to be set again after this call
    ColorDrawable colorDrawable = (ColorDrawable) background;
    colorDrawable.setColor(ContextCompat.getColor(mContext,R.color.colorToSet));
}

Compact version:

Drawable background = imageView.getBackground();
if (background instanceof ShapeDrawable) {
    ((ShapeDrawable)background).getPaint().setColor(ContextCompat.getColor(mContext,R.color.colorToSet));
} else if (background instanceof GradientDrawable) {
    ((GradientDrawable)background).setColor(ContextCompat.getColor(mContext,R.color.colorToSet));
} else if (background instanceof ColorDrawable) {
    ((ColorDrawable)background).setColor(ContextCompat.getColor(mContext,R.color.colorToSet));
}

Note that null-checking is not required.

However, you should use mutate() on the drawables before modifying them if they are used elsewhere. (By default, drawables loaded from XML share the same state.)

#62 Best answer 2 of Set android shape color programmatically(Score: 53)

Created: 2018-07-02 Last updated: 2020-06-01

A simpler solution nowadays would be to use your shape as a background and then programmatically change its color via:

view.background.setColorFilter(Color.parseColor("#343434"), PorterDuff.Mode.SRC_ATOP)

See PorterDuff.Mode for the available options.

UPDATE (API 29):

The above method is deprecated since API 29 and replaced by the following:

view.background.colorFilter = BlendModeColorFilter(Color.parseColor("#343434"), BlendMode.SRC_ATOP)

See BlendMode for the available options.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#63: How to implement a ViewPager with different Fragments / Layouts (Score: 193)

Created: 2013-08-23 Last updated: 2017-07-28

Tags: android, android-layout, android-fragments, android-viewpager, fragmentpageradapter

When I start an activity which implements viewpager, the viewpager created various fragments. I want to use different layouts for each fragment, but the problem is that viewpager shows only two layouts at the max (second layout on all of the remaining fragments after 1).

Here is the code for SwipeActivity which implements the viewpager :

public class SwipeActivity extends FragmentActivity
{

    MyPageAdapter pageAdapter;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_swipe);
        pageAdapter = new MyPageAdapter(getSupportFragmentManager());
        ViewPager pager=(ViewPager)findViewById(R.id.pager);
        pager.setAdapter(pageAdapter);
        ActionBar bar = getActionBar();
        bar.setDisplayHomeAsUpEnabled(true);
    }
    /**
    * Custom Page adapter
    */
    private class MyPageAdapter extends FragmentPagerAdapter
    {
        public MyPageAdapter(FragmentManager fm)
        {
            super(fm);
        }
        @Override
        public int getCount()
        {
            return 5;
        }
        @Override
        public Fragment getItem(int position)
        {
            switch(position)
            {
                case 0: return new MyFragment();
                case 1: return SecondFragment.newInstance("asdasd");
                default : return RamFragment.newInstance("s");
            }
        }
     }
}

Here is the code for the fragments

public class MyFragment extends Fragment
{
   @Override
   public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater paramLayoutInflater, ViewGroup paramViewGroup,    Bundle paramBundle)
   {
     return paramLayoutInflater.inflate(R.layout.processorlayout, paramViewGroup, false);
   }
}

I used 5 fragments like this, all having different layouts, but the viewpager shows only 2 at the max.

EDIT : code for SecondFragment

public class SecondFragment extends Fragment
{
   public static final String EXTRA_MESSAGE = "EXTRA_MESSAGE";

  public static final SecondFragment newInstance(String paramString)
  {
    SecondFragment f = new SecondFragment();
    Bundle localBundle = new Bundle(1);
    localBundle.putString("EXTRA_MESSAGE", paramString);
    f.setArguments(localBundle);
    return f;
  }

  @Override
  public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater paramLayoutInflater, ViewGroup paramViewGroup, Bundle paramBundle)
  {
     return paramLayoutInflater.inflate(R.layout.motherboardlayout, paramViewGroup, false);
  }
}

#63 Best answer 1 of How to implement a ViewPager with different Fragments / Layouts (Score: 528)

Created: 2013-08-23 Last updated: 2020-02-06

As this is a very frequently asked question, I wanted to take the time and effort to explain the ViewPager with multiple Fragments and Layouts in detail. Here you go.

ViewPager with multiple Fragments and Layout files - How To

The following is a complete example of how to implement a ViewPager with different fragment Types and different layout files.

In this case, I have 3 Fragment classes, and a different layout file for each class. In order to keep things simple, the fragment-layouts only differ in their background color. Of course, any layout-file can be used for the Fragments.

FirstFragment.java has a orange background layout, SecondFragment.java has a green background layout and ThirdFragment.java has a red background layout. Furthermore, each Fragment displays a different text, depending on which class it is from and which instance it is.

Also be aware that I am using the support-library’s Fragment: android.support.v4.app.Fragment

MainActivity.java (Initializes the Viewpager and has the adapter for it as an inner class). Again have a look at the imports. I am using the android.support.v4 package.

import android.os.Bundle;
import android.support.v4.app.Fragment;
import android.support.v4.app.FragmentActivity;
import android.support.v4.app.FragmentManager;
import android.support.v4.app.FragmentPagerAdapter;
import android.support.v4.view.ViewPager;

public class MainActivity extends FragmentActivity {

	@Override
	protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);		
	
        ViewPager pager = (ViewPager) findViewById(R.id.viewPager);
        pager.setAdapter(new MyPagerAdapter(getSupportFragmentManager()));
	}
	
	private class MyPagerAdapter extends FragmentPagerAdapter {

        public MyPagerAdapter(FragmentManager fm) {
            super(fm);
        }

        @Override
        public Fragment getItem(int pos) {
            switch(pos) {
			
            case 0: return FirstFragment.newInstance("FirstFragment, Instance 1");
            case 1: return SecondFragment.newInstance("SecondFragment, Instance 1");
            case 2: return ThirdFragment.newInstance("ThirdFragment, Instance 1");
            case 3: return ThirdFragment.newInstance("ThirdFragment, Instance 2");
            case 4: return ThirdFragment.newInstance("ThirdFragment, Instance 3");
            default: return ThirdFragment.newInstance("ThirdFragment, Default");
            }
        }

        @Override
        public int getCount() {
            return 5;
        }		
	}
}

activity_main.xml (The MainActivitys .xml file) - a simple layout file, only containing the ViewPager that fills the whole screen.

<android.support.v4.view.ViewPager
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
	xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
    android:id="@+id/viewPager"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent"
    />

The Fragment classes, FirstFragment.java import android.support.v4.app.Fragment;

public class FirstFragment extends Fragment {
	
	@Override
	public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        View v = inflater.inflate(R.layout.first_frag, container, false);
		
        TextView tv = (TextView) v.findViewById(R.id.tvFragFirst);
        tv.setText(getArguments().getString("msg"));
		
        return v;
	}

	public static FirstFragment newInstance(String text) {
		
        FirstFragment f = new FirstFragment();
        Bundle b = new Bundle();
        b.putString("msg", text);
		
        f.setArguments(b);
		
        return f;
	}
}

first_frag.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:background="@android:color/holo_orange_dark" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/tvFragFirst"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_centerVertical="true"
        android:textSize="26dp"
        android:text="TextView" />
</RelativeLayout>

SecondFragment.java

public class SecondFragment extends Fragment {

@Override
public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
	View v = inflater.inflate(R.layout.second_frag, container, false);
	
	TextView tv = (TextView) v.findViewById(R.id.tvFragSecond);
	tv.setText(getArguments().getString("msg"));
	
	return v;
}

public static SecondFragment newInstance(String text) {
	
	SecondFragment f = new SecondFragment();
	Bundle b = new Bundle();
	b.putString("msg", text);
	
	f.setArguments(b);
	
	return f;
}
}

second_frag.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:background="@android:color/holo_green_dark" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/tvFragSecond"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_centerVertical="true"
        android:textSize="26dp"
        android:text="TextView" />

</RelativeLayout>

ThirdFragment.java

public class ThirdFragment extends Fragment {

@Override
public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
	View v = inflater.inflate(R.layout.third_frag, container, false);
	
	TextView tv = (TextView) v.findViewById(R.id.tvFragThird);		
	tv.setText(getArguments().getString("msg"));
	
	return v;
}

public static ThirdFragment newInstance(String text) {
	
	ThirdFragment f = new ThirdFragment();
	Bundle b = new Bundle();
	b.putString("msg", text);
	
	f.setArguments(b);
	
	return f;
}
}

third_frag.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:background="@android:color/holo_red_light" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/tvFragThird"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_centerVertical="true"
        android:textSize="26dp"
        android:text="TextView" />

</RelativeLayout>

The end result is the following:

The Viewpager holds 5 Fragments, Fragments 1 is of type FirstFragment, and displays the first_frag.xml layout, Fragment 2 is of type SecondFragment and displays the second_frag.xml, and Fragment 3-5 are of type ThirdFragment and all display the third_frag.xml.

enter image description here

Above you can see the 5 Fragments between which can be switched via swipe to the left or right. Only one Fragment can be displayed at the same time of course.

Last but not least:

I would recommend that you use an empty constructor in each of your Fragment classes.

Instead of handing over potential parameters via constructor, use the newInstance(...) method and the Bundle for handing over parameters.

This way if detached and re-attached the object state can be stored through the arguments. Much like Bundles attached to Intents.

#63 Best answer 2 of How to implement a ViewPager with different Fragments / Layouts(Score: 10)

Created: 2016-11-16 Last updated: 2016-11-16

Create an array of Views and apply it to: container.addView(viewarr[position]);

public class Layoutes extends PagerAdapter {

    private Context context;
    private LayoutInflater layoutInflater;
    Layoutes(Context context){
        this.context=context;
    }
    int layoutes[]={R.layout.one,R.layout.two,R.layout.three};
    @Override
    public int getCount() {
        return layoutes.length;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isViewFromObject(View view, Object object) {
        return (view==(LinearLayout)object);
    }
    @Override
    public Object instantiateItem(ViewGroup container, int position){
        layoutInflater=(LayoutInflater) context.getSystemService(Context.LAYOUT_INFLATER_SERVICE);
        View one=layoutInflater.inflate(R.layout.one,container,false);
        View two=layoutInflater.inflate(R.layout.two,container,false);
        View three=layoutInflater.inflate(R.layout.three,container,false);
        View viewarr[]={one,two,three};
        container.addView(viewarr[position]);
        return viewarr[position];
    }
    @Override
    public void destroyItem(ViewGroup container, int position, Object object){
        container.removeView((LinearLayout) object);
    }

}

See also original question in stackoverflow

#64: Evenly spacing views using ConstraintLayout (Score: 193)

Created: 2016-05-30

Tags: android, android-layout, android-constraintlayout

A common use for LinearLayout is to evenly space (weight) views, for example: example layout

How do you implement evenly spaced views like this using the new ConstraintLayout?

ConstraintLayout links for reference: blog post, I/O session video

#64 Best answer 1 of Evenly spacing views using ConstraintLayout (Score: 357)

Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2017-10-03

There are two ways to accomplish this using ConstraintLayout: Chains and Guidelines. To use Chains, make sure you are using ConstraintLayout Beta 3 or newer and if you want to use the visual layout editor in Android Studio, make sure you are using Android Studio 2.3 Beta 1 or newer.

Method 1 - Using Chains

Open the layout editor and add your widgets as normal, adding parent constraints as needed. In this case, I have added two buttons with constraints to the bottom of the parent and side of the parent (left side for Save button and right side for Share button):

enter image description here

Note that in this state, if I flip to landscape view, the views do not fill the parent but are anchored to the corners:

enter image description here

Highlight both views, either by Ctrl/Cmd clicking or by dragging a box around the views:

enter image description here

Then right-click on the views and choose “Center Horizontally”:

enter image description here

This sets up a bi-directional connection between the views (which is how a Chain is defined). By default the chain style is “spread”, which is applied even when no XML attribute is included. Sticking with this chain style but setting the width of our views to 0dp lets the views fill the available space, spreading evenly across the parent:

enter image description here

This is more noticeable in landscape view:

enter image description here

If you prefer to skip the layout editor, the resulting XML will look like:

<android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout
xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="match_parent">

<Button
    android:id="@+id/button_save"
    android:layout_width="0dp"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:text="@string/button_save_text"
    android:layout_marginStart="8dp"
    android:layout_marginBottom="8dp"
    android:layout_marginEnd="4dp"
    app:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf="parent"
    app:layout_constraintBottom_toBottomOf="parent"
    app:layout_constraintRight_toLeftOf="@+id/button_share"
    app:layout_constraintHorizontal_chainStyle="spread" />

<Button
    android:id="@+id/button_share"
    android:layout_width="0dp"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:text="@string/button_share_text"
    android:layout_marginStart="4dp"
    android:layout_marginEnd="8dp"
    android:layout_marginBottom="8dp"
    app:layout_constraintLeft_toRightOf="@+id/button_save"
    app:layout_constraintRight_toRightOf="parent"
    app:layout_constraintBottom_toBottomOf="parent" />

</android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout>

Details:

  • setting the width of each item to 0dp or MATCH_CONSTRAINT lets the views fill the parent (optional)
  • the views must be linked together bidirectionally (right of save button links to share button, left of share button links to save button), this will happen automatically via the layout editor when choosing “Center Horizontally”
  • the first view in the chain can specify the chain style via layout_constraintHorizontal_chainStyle, see the documentation for various chain styles, if the chain style is omitted, the default is “spread”
  • the weighting of the chain can be adjusted via layout_constraintHorizontal_weight
  • this example is for a horizontal chain, there are corresponding attributes for vertical chains

Method 2 - Using a Guideline

Open your layout in the editor and click the guideline button:

enter image description here

Then select “Add Vertical Guideline”: enter image description here

A new guideline will appear, that by default, will likely be anchored to the left in relative values (denoted by left-facing arrow):

layout editor relative guideline

Click the left-facing arrow to switch it to a percentage value, then drag the guideline to the 50% mark:

layout editor percent guideline

The guideline can now be used as an anchor for other views. In my example, I attached the right of the save button and the left of the share button to the guideline:

final layout

If you want the views to fill up the available space then the constraint should be set to “Any Size” (the squiggly lines running horizontally):

any size constraint

(This is the same as setting the layout_width to 0dp).

A guideline can also be created in XML quite easily rather than using the layout editor:

<android.support.constraint.Guideline
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:id="@+id/guideline"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    app:layout_constraintGuide_percent="0.5" />

#64 Best answer 2 of Evenly spacing views using ConstraintLayout(Score: 57)

Created: 2018-10-19 Last updated: 2018-10-19

To create 2 views in same line, equal width, just need to define

<android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    >

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button1"
        android:layout_width="0dp"  
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Button 1"
        app:layout_constraintEnd_toStartOf="@+id/button2"
        app:layout_constraintStart_toStartOf="parent" />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button2"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Button 2"
        app:layout_constraintEnd_toEndOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintStart_toEndOf="@+id/button1" />

</android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout>

Note

  • width = 0dp (MATCH_CONSTRAINT)
  • Constraint of button1 and button2 must like above

Result

MORE
If you want View1 bigger than View2 you can use weight or percent.
Example, View1 width = 2 *View2 width use weight

<android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    >

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button3"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Button 3"
        app:layout_constraintEnd_toStartOf="@+id/button4"
        app:layout_constraintHorizontal_weight="2"
        app:layout_constraintStart_toStartOf="parent"
        />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button4"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Button 4"
        app:layout_constraintEnd_toEndOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintHorizontal_weight="1"
        app:layout_constraintStart_toEndOf="@+id/button3"
        />

</android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout>

Result

Example, View1 width = 2 *View2 width use percent

<android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    >

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button5"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Button 5"
        app:layout_constraintEnd_toStartOf="@+id/button6"
        app:layout_constraintStart_toStartOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintWidth_percent="0.667"
        />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button6"
        android:layout_width="0dp"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Button 6"
        app:layout_constraintEnd_toEndOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintStart_toEndOf="@+id/button5"
        app:layout_constraintWidth_percent="0.333"
        />

</android.support.constraint.ConstraintLayout>

Result

See also original question in stackoverflow

#65: Android Paint: .measureText() vs .getTextBounds() (Score: 193)

Created: 2011-09-25 Last updated: 2011-10-04

Tags: android, android-layout, textview

I’m measuring text using Paint.getTextBounds(), since I’m interested in getting both the height and width of the text to be rendered. However, the actual text rendered is always a bit wider than the .width() of the Rect information filled by getTextBounds().

To my surprise, I tested .measureText(), and found that it returns a different (higher) value. I gave it a try, and found it correct.

Why do they report different widths? How can I correctly obtain the height and width? I mean, I can use .measureText(), but then I wouldn’t know if I should trust the .height() returned by getTextBounds().

As requested, here is minimal code to reproduce the problem:

final String someText = "Hello. I believe I'm some text!";

Paint p = new Paint();
Rect bounds = new Rect();

for (float f = 10; f < 40; f += 1f) {
    p.setTextSize(f);
    
    p.getTextBounds(someText, 0, someText.length(), bounds);
    
    Log.d("Test", String.format(
        "Size %f, measureText %f, getTextBounds %d",
        f,
        p.measureText(someText),
        bounds.width())
    );
}

The output shows that the difference not only gets greater than 1 (and is no last-minute rounding error), but also seems to increase with size (I was about to draw more conclusions, but it may be entirely font-dependent):

D/Test    (  607): Size 10.000000, measureText 135.000000, getTextBounds 134
D/Test    (  607): Size 11.000000, measureText 149.000000, getTextBounds 148
D/Test    (  607): Size 12.000000, measureText 156.000000, getTextBounds 155
D/Test    (  607): Size 13.000000, measureText 171.000000, getTextBounds 169
D/Test    (  607): Size 14.000000, measureText 195.000000, getTextBounds 193
D/Test    (  607): Size 15.000000, measureText 201.000000, getTextBounds 199
D/Test    (  607): Size 16.000000, measureText 211.000000, getTextBounds 210
D/Test    (  607): Size 17.000000, measureText 225.000000, getTextBounds 223
D/Test    (  607): Size 18.000000, measureText 245.000000, getTextBounds 243
D/Test    (  607): Size 19.000000, measureText 251.000000, getTextBounds 249
D/Test    (  607): Size 20.000000, measureText 269.000000, getTextBounds 267
D/Test    (  607): Size 21.000000, measureText 275.000000, getTextBounds 272
D/Test    (  607): Size 22.000000, measureText 297.000000, getTextBounds 294
D/Test    (  607): Size 23.000000, measureText 305.000000, getTextBounds 302
D/Test    (  607): Size 24.000000, measureText 319.000000, getTextBounds 316
D/Test    (  607): Size 25.000000, measureText 330.000000, getTextBounds 326
D/Test    (  607): Size 26.000000, measureText 349.000000, getTextBounds 346
D/Test    (  607): Size 27.000000, measureText 357.000000, getTextBounds 354
D/Test    (  607): Size 28.000000, measureText 369.000000, getTextBounds 365
D/Test    (  607): Size 29.000000, measureText 396.000000, getTextBounds 392
D/Test    (  607): Size 30.000000, measureText 401.000000, getTextBounds 397
D/Test    (  607): Size 31.000000, measureText 418.000000, getTextBounds 414
D/Test    (  607): Size 32.000000, measureText 423.000000, getTextBounds 418
D/Test    (  607): Size 33.000000, measureText 446.000000, getTextBounds 441
D/Test    (  607): Size 34.000000, measureText 455.000000, getTextBounds 450
D/Test    (  607): Size 35.000000, measureText 468.000000, getTextBounds 463
D/Test    (  607): Size 36.000000, measureText 474.000000, getTextBounds 469
D/Test    (  607): Size 37.000000, measureText 500.000000, getTextBounds 495
D/Test    (  607): Size 38.000000, measureText 506.000000, getTextBounds 501
D/Test    (  607): Size 39.000000, measureText 521.000000, getTextBounds 515

#65 Best answer 1 of Android Paint: .measureText() vs .getTextBounds() (Score: 381)

Created: 2011-09-28 Last updated: 2018-03-11

You can do what I did to inspect such problem:

Study Android source code, Paint.java source, see both measureText and getTextBounds methods. You’d learn that measureText calls native_measureText, and getTextBounds calls nativeGetStringBounds, which are native methods implemented in C++.

So you’d continue to study Paint.cpp, which implements both.

native_measureText -> SkPaintGlue::measureText_CII

nativeGetStringBounds -> SkPaintGlue::getStringBounds

Now your study checks where these methods differ. After some param checks, both call function SkPaint::measureText in Skia Lib (part of Android), but they both call different overloaded form.

Digging further into Skia, I see that both calls result into same computation in same function, only return result differently.

To answer your question: Both your calls do same computation. Possible difference of result lies in fact that getTextBounds returns bounds as integer, while measureText returns float value.

So what you get is rounding error during conversion of float to int, and this happens in Paint.cpp in SkPaintGlue::doTextBounds in call to function SkRect::roundOut.

The difference between computed width of those two calls may be maximally 1.

EDIT 4 Oct 2011

What may be better than visualization. I took the effort, for own exploring, and for deserving bounty :)

enter image description here

This is font size 60, in red is bounds rectangle, in purple is result of measureText.

It’s seen that bounds left part starts some pixels from left, and value of measureText is incremented by this value on both left and right. This is something called Glyph’s AdvanceX value. (I’ve discovered this in Skia sources in SkPaint.cpp)

So the outcome of the test is that measureText adds some advance value to the text on both sides, while getTextBounds computes minimal bounds where given text will fit.

Hope this result is useful to you.

Testing code:

  protected void onDraw(Canvas canvas){
     final String s = "Hello. I'm some text!";

     Paint p = new Paint();
     Rect bounds = new Rect();
     p.setTextSize(60);

     p.getTextBounds(s, 0, s.length(), bounds);
     float mt = p.measureText(s);
     int bw = bounds.width();
     
     Log.i("LCG", String.format(
          "measureText %f, getTextBounds %d (%s)",
          mt,
          bw, bounds.toShortString())
      );
     bounds.offset(0, -bounds.top);
     p.setStyle(Style.STROKE);
     canvas.drawColor(0xff000080);
     p.setColor(0xffff0000);
     canvas.drawRect(bounds, p);
     p.setColor(0xff00ff00);
     canvas.drawText(s, 0, bounds.bottom, p);
  }

#65 Best answer 2 of Android Paint: .measureText() vs .getTextBounds()(Score: 22)

Created: 2011-10-04 Last updated: 2012-05-25

My experience with this is that getTextBounds will return that absolute minimal bounding rect that encapsulates the text, not necessarily the measured width used when rendering. I also want to say that measureText assumes one line.

In order to get accurate measuring results, you should use the StaticLayout to render the text and pull out the measurements.

For example:

String text = "text";
TextPaint textPaint = textView.getPaint();
int boundedWidth = 1000;

StaticLayout layout = new StaticLayout(text, textPaint, boundedWidth , Alignment.ALIGN_NORMAL, 1.0f, 0.0f, false);
int height = layout.getHeight();

See also original question in stackoverflow

#66: Getting activity from context in android (Score: 191)

Created: 2012-03-27 Last updated: 2015-04-29

Tags: android, android-layout, android-activity, view, hierarchy

This one has me stumped.

I need to call an activity method from within a custom layout class. The problem with this is that I don’t know how to access the activity from within the layout.

ProfileView

public class ProfileView extends LinearLayout
{
    TextView profileTitleTextView;
    ImageView profileScreenImageButton;
    boolean isEmpty;
    ProfileData data;
    String name;

    public ProfileView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, String name, final ProfileData profileData)
    {
        super(context, attrs);
        ......
        ......
    }

    //Heres where things get complicated
    public void onClick(View v)
    {
        //Need to get the parent activity and call its method.
        ProfileActivity x = (ProfileActivity) context;
        x.activityMethod();
    }
}

##ProfileActivity##

public class ProfileActivityActivity extends Activity
{
    //In here I am creating multiple ProfileViews and adding them to the activity dynamically.
 
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.profile_activity_main);
    }

    public void addProfilesToThisView()
    {
        ProfileData tempPd = new tempPd(.....)
        Context actvitiyContext = this.getApplicationContext();
        //Profile view needs context, null, name and a profileData
        ProfileView pv = new ProfileView(actvitiyContext, null, temp, tempPd);
        profileLayout.addView(pv);
    }
}

As you can see above, I am instantiating the profileView programatically and passing in the activityContext with it. 2 questions:

  1. Am i passing the correct context into the Profileview?
  2. How do I get the containing activity from the context?

#66 Best answer 1 of Getting activity from context in android (Score: 483)

Created: 2012-03-27 Last updated: 2016-09-11

From your Activity, just pass in this as the Context for your layout:

ProfileView pv = new ProfileView(this, null, temp, tempPd);

Afterwards you will have a Context in the layout, but you will know it is actually your Activity and you can cast it so that you have what you need:

Activity activity = (Activity) context;

#66 Best answer 2 of Getting activity from context in android(Score: 47)

Created: 2017-09-13

This is something that I have used successfully to convert Context to Activity when operating within the UI in fragments or custom views. It will unpack ContextWrapper recursively or return null if it fails.

public Activity getActivity(Context context)
{
	if (context == null)
	{
        return null;
	}
	else if (context instanceof ContextWrapper)
	{
        if (context instanceof Activity)
        {
            return (Activity) context;
        }
        else
        {
            return getActivity(((ContextWrapper) context).getBaseContext());
        }
	}

	return null;
}

See also original question in stackoverflow

#67: How do I make WRAP_CONTENT work on a RecyclerView (Score: 188)

Created: 2014-12-14 Last updated: 2021-03-03

Tags: android, android-layout, android-fragments, android-recyclerview

I have a DialogFragment that contains a RecyclerView (a list of cards).

Within this RecyclerView are one or more CardViews that can have any height.

I want to give this DialogFragment the correct height based on the CardViews that are contained within.

Normally this would be simple, I would set wrap_content on the RecyclerView like this.

<android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView ...
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:id="@+id/recycler_view"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"   
    android:clickable="true"   
    android:scrollbars="vertical" >

</android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView>

Because I am using a RecyclerView this does not work:

https://issuetracker.google.com/issues/37001674

and

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/26649406/nested-recycler-view-height-doesnt-wrap-its-content

On both of these pages people suggest to extend LinearLayoutManager and to override onMeasure()

I first used the LayoutManager that someone provided in the first link:

public static class WrappingLayoutManager extends LinearLayoutManager {

        public WrappingLayoutManager(Context context) {
            super(context);
        }

        private int[] mMeasuredDimension = new int[2];

        @Override
        public void onMeasure(RecyclerView.Recycler recycler, RecyclerView.State state,
                              int widthSpec, int heightSpec) {
            final int widthMode = View.MeasureSpec.getMode(widthSpec);
            final int heightMode = View.MeasureSpec.getMode(heightSpec);
            final int widthSize = View.MeasureSpec.getSize(widthSpec);
            final int heightSize = View.MeasureSpec.getSize(heightSpec);

            measureScrapChild(recycler, 0,
                    View.MeasureSpec.makeMeasureSpec(0, View.MeasureSpec.UNSPECIFIED),
                    View.MeasureSpec.makeMeasureSpec(0, View.MeasureSpec.UNSPECIFIED),
                    mMeasuredDimension);

            int width = mMeasuredDimension[0];
            int height = mMeasuredDimension[1];

            switch (widthMode) {
                case View.MeasureSpec.EXACTLY:
                case View.MeasureSpec.AT_MOST:
                    width = widthSize;
                    break;
                case View.MeasureSpec.UNSPECIFIED:
            }

            switch (heightMode) {
                case View.MeasureSpec.EXACTLY:
                case View.MeasureSpec.AT_MOST:
                    height = heightSize;
                    break;
                case View.MeasureSpec.UNSPECIFIED:
            }

            setMeasuredDimension(width, height);
        }

        private void measureScrapChild(RecyclerView.Recycler recycler, int position, int widthSpec,
                                       int heightSpec, int[] measuredDimension) {
            View view = recycler.getViewForPosition(position);
            if (view != null) {
                RecyclerView.LayoutParams p = (RecyclerView.LayoutParams) view.getLayoutParams();
                int childWidthSpec = ViewGroup.getChildMeasureSpec(widthSpec,
                        getPaddingLeft() + getPaddingRight(), p.width);
                int childHeightSpec = ViewGroup.getChildMeasureSpec(heightSpec,
                        getPaddingTop() + getPaddingBottom(), p.height);
                view.measure(childWidthSpec, childHeightSpec);
                measuredDimension[0] = view.getMeasuredWidth();
                measuredDimension[1] = view.getMeasuredHeight();
                recycler.recycleView(view);
            }
        }
    }

However this did not work because

heightSize = View.MeasureSpec.getSize(heightSpec);

returns a very large value that appear to be related to match_parent.

By commenting height = heightSize; (in the second switch case) I managed to make the height work but only if a TextView child inside the CardView does not wrap its own text (a long sentence).

As soon as that TextView wraps it’s own text the height SHOULD increase but it doesn’t. It calculated the height for that long sentence as a single line, not a wrapped line (2 or more).

Any advice on how I should improve this LayoutManager so my RecyclerView works with WRAP_CONTENT?

Edit: This layout manager might work for most people, but it still has problems with scrolling and calculating heights of wrapping textviews

public class MyLinearLayoutManager extends LinearLayoutManager {

public MyLinearLayoutManager(Context context, int orientation, boolean reverseLayout)    {
    super(context, orientation, reverseLayout);
}

private int[] mMeasuredDimension = new int[2];

@Override
public void onMeasure(RecyclerView.Recycler recycler, RecyclerView.State state,
                      int widthSpec, int heightSpec) {
    final int widthMode = View.MeasureSpec.getMode(widthSpec);
    final int heightMode = View.MeasureSpec.getMode(heightSpec);
    final int widthSize = View.MeasureSpec.getSize(widthSpec);
    final int heightSize = View.MeasureSpec.getSize(heightSpec);
    int width = 0;
    int height = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < getItemCount(); i++) {
        measureScrapChild(recycler, i,
                View.MeasureSpec.makeMeasureSpec(i, View.MeasureSpec.UNSPECIFIED),
                View.MeasureSpec.makeMeasureSpec(i, View.MeasureSpec.UNSPECIFIED),
                mMeasuredDimension);

        if (getOrientation() == HORIZONTAL) {
            width = width + mMeasuredDimension[0];
            if (i == 0) {
                height = mMeasuredDimension[1];
            }
        } else {
            height = height + mMeasuredDimension[1];
            if (i == 0) {
                width = mMeasuredDimension[0];
            }
        }
    }
    switch (widthMode) {
        case View.MeasureSpec.EXACTLY:
            width = widthSize;
        case View.MeasureSpec.AT_MOST:
        case View.MeasureSpec.UNSPECIFIED:
    }

    switch (heightMode) {
        case View.MeasureSpec.EXACTLY:
            height = heightSize;
        case View.MeasureSpec.AT_MOST:
        case View.MeasureSpec.UNSPECIFIED:
    }

    setMeasuredDimension(width, height);
}

    private void measureScrapChild(RecyclerView.Recycler recycler, int position, int widthSpec,
                                   int heightSpec, int[] measuredDimension) {
        View view = recycler.getViewForPosition(position);
        if (view != null) {
            RecyclerView.LayoutParams p = (RecyclerView.LayoutParams) view.getLayoutParams();
            int childWidthSpec = ViewGroup.getChildMeasureSpec(widthSpec,
                    getPaddingLeft() + getPaddingRight(), p.width);
            int childHeightSpec = ViewGroup.getChildMeasureSpec(heightSpec,
                    getPaddingTop() + getPaddingBottom(), p.height);
            view.measure(childWidthSpec, childHeightSpec);
            measuredDimension[0] = view.getMeasuredWidth() + p.leftMargin + p.rightMargin;
            measuredDimension[1] = view.getMeasuredHeight() + p.bottomMargin + p.topMargin;
            recycler.recycleView(view);
        }
    }
}

#67 Best answer 1 of How do I make WRAP_CONTENT work on a RecyclerView (Score: 188)

Created: 2016-02-25 Last updated: 2018-01-06

From Android Support Library 23.2.1 update, all WRAP_CONTENT should work correctly.

Please update version of a library in gradle file OR to further :

compile 'com.android.support:recyclerview-v7:23.2.1'

solved some issue like Fixed bugs related to various measure-spec methods

Check http://developer.android.com/tools/support-library/features.html#v7-recyclerview

you can check Support Library revision history

#67 Best answer 2 of How do I make WRAP_CONTENT work on a RecyclerView(Score: 80)

Created: 2018-04-12 Last updated: 2020-07-02

UPDATE 02.07.2020
This method may prevent recycling and should not be used on large data sets.

UPDATE 05.07.2019

If you are using RecyclerView inside a ScrollView, just change ScrollView to androidx.core.widget.NestedScrollView. Inside this view there is no need to pack RecyclerView inside a RelativeLayout.

<androidx.core.widget.NestedScrollView
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent">

    <LinearLayout
        android:orientation="vertical"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content">

        <!-- other views -->

        <androidx.recyclerview.widget.RecyclerView
            android:id="@+id/list"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

        <!-- other views -->

    </LinearLayout>

</androidx.core.widget.NestedScrollView>

Finally found the solution for this problem.

All you need to do is wrap the RecyclerView in a RelativeLayout. Maybe there are other Views which may also work.

<RelativeLayout
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content">

    <androidx.recyclerview.widget.RecyclerView
        android:id="@+id/list"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

</RelativeLayout>

See also original question in stackoverflow

#68: String Resource new line /n not possible? (Score: 187)

Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2020-06-25

Tags: android, xml, android-layout, newline, android-resources

It doesn’t seem like it’s possible to add a new line /n to an XML resource string. Is there another way of doing this?

#68 Best answer 1 of String Resource new line /n not possible? (Score: 405)

Created: 2011-03-28 Last updated: 2020-06-25

use a blackslash not a forwardslash. \n

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <string name="title">Hello\nWorld!</string>
</resources>

Also, if you plan on using the string as HTML, you can use &lt;br /&gt; for a line break(<br />)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <string name="title">Hello&lt;br /&gt;World!</string>
</resources>

#68 Best answer 2 of String Resource new line /n not possible?(Score: 50)

Created: 2013-06-25 Last updated: 2020-06-20

I know this is pretty old question but it topped the list when I searched. So I wanted to update with another method.

In the strings.xml file you can do the \n or you can simply press enter:

<string name="Your string name" > This is your string.

   This is the second line of your string.\n\n Third line of your string.</string>

This will result in the following on your TextView:

This is your string.

This is the second line of your string.

Third line of your string.

This is because there were two returns between the beginning declaration of the string and the new line. I also added the \n to it for clarity, as either can be used. I like to use the carriage returns in the xml to be able to see a list or whatever multiline string I have. My two cents.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#69: How to adjust layout when soft keyboard appears (Score: 186)

Created: 2013-05-07 Last updated: 2017-05-23

Tags: android, android-layout, android-softkeyboard

I would like to adjust/re-size the layout when the soft-keyboard activated, as below:

Before and After:

enter image description hereenter image description here


Found couple resources in SO:

  1. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/10493506/how-to-keep-all-fields-and-texts-visible-while-the-soft-keyboard-is-shown
  2. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/13136891/android-soft-keyboard-spoils-layout-when-appears
  3. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7300497/adjust-layout-when-soft-keyboard-is-on

But the questions & answers are rather ambiguous, here’s the question with clearer picture of what I want.

Requirements:

  • It should work on phone with any screen sizes.
  • Noticed that the margin/padding space at “FACEBOOK” and “Sign Up for Facebook” has changed before and after.
  • No scroll view is involved.

#69 Best answer 1 of How to adjust layout when soft keyboard appears (Score: 228)

Created: 2013-05-07 Last updated: 2015-02-27

Just add

android:windowSoftInputMode="adjustResize"

in your AndroidManifest.xml where you declare this particular activity and this will adjust the layout resize option.

enter image description here

some source code below for layout design

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textView1"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
        android:text="FaceBook"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceLarge" />

    <EditText
        android:id="@+id/editText1"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/textView1"
        android:layout_marginTop="30dp"
        android:ems="10"
        android:hint="username" >

        <requestFocus />
    </EditText>

    <EditText
        android:id="@+id/editText2"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/editText1"
        android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
        android:ems="10"
        android:hint="password" />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button1"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@+id/editText2"
        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
        android:layout_marginLeft="18dp"
        android:layout_marginTop="20dp"
        android:text="Log In" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textView2"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_alignParentBottom="true"
        android:layout_marginTop="17dp"
        android:gravity="center"
        android:text="Sign up for facebook"
        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceLarge" />

</RelativeLayout>

#69 Best answer 2 of How to adjust layout when soft keyboard appears(Score: 42)

Created: 2016-02-01

This question has beeen asked a few years ago and “Secret Andro Geni” has a good base explanation and “tir38” also made a good attempt on the complete solution, but alas there is no complete solution posted here. I’ve spend a couple of hours figuring out things and here is my complete solution with detailed explanation at the bottom:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<ScrollView
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:fillViewport="true">

    <RelativeLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:padding="10dp">

        <RelativeLayout
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_above="@+id/mainLayout"
            android:layout_alignParentTop="true"
            android:id="@+id/headerLayout">

            <LinearLayout
                android:layout_width="match_parent"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:layout_centerVertical="true"
                android:gravity="center_horizontal">

                <TextView
                    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
                    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                    android:id="@+id/textView1"
                    android:text="facebook"
                    android:textStyle="bold"
                    android:ellipsize="marquee"
                    android:singleLine="true"
                    android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceLarge" />

            </LinearLayout>

        </RelativeLayout>

        <LinearLayout
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_centerVertical="true"
            android:id="@+id/mainLayout"
            android:orientation="vertical">

            <EditText
                android:layout_width="match_parent"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:id="@+id/editText1"
                android:ems="10"
                android:hint="Email or Phone"
                android:inputType="textVisiblePassword">

                <requestFocus />
            </EditText>

            <EditText
                android:layout_width="match_parent"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:layout_marginTop="10dp"
                android:id="@+id/editText2"
                android:ems="10"
                android:hint="Password"
                android:inputType="textPassword" />

            <Button
                android:layout_width="match_parent"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:layout_marginTop="10dp"
                android:id="@+id/button1"
                android:text="Log In"
                android:onClick="login" />

        </LinearLayout>

        <RelativeLayout
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_alignParentBottom="true"
            android:layout_below="@+id/mainLayout"
            android:id="@+id/footerLayout">

            <LinearLayout
                android:layout_width="match_parent"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:layout_alignParentBottom="true">

                <RelativeLayout
                    android:layout_width="match_parent"
                    android:layout_height="wrap_content">

                    <TextView
                        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
                        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                        android:id="@+id/textView2"
                        android:text="Sign Up for Facebook"
                        android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
                        android:layout_alignBottom="@+id/helpButton"
                        android:ellipsize="marquee"
                        android:singleLine="true"
                        android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceSmall" />

                    <Button
                        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
                        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                        android:layout_alignParentRight="true"
                        android:id="@+id/helpButton"
                        android:text="\?"
                        android:onClick="help" />

                </RelativeLayout>

            </LinearLayout>

        </RelativeLayout>

    </RelativeLayout>

</ScrollView>

And in AndroidManifest.xml, don’t forget to set:

android:windowSoftInputMode="adjustResize"

on the <activity> tag that you want such layout.

Thoughts:

I’ve realized that RelativeLayout are the layouts that span thru all available space and are then resized when the keyboard pops up.

And LinearLayout are layouts that don’t get resized in the resizing process.

That’s why you need to have 1 RelativeLayout immediately after ScrollView to span thru all available screen space. And you need to have a LinearLayout inside a RelativeLayout else your insides would get crushed when the resizing occurs. Good example is “headerLayout”. If there wouldn’t be a LinearLayout inside that RelativeLayout “facebook” text would get crushed and wouldn’t be shown.

In the “facebook” login pictures posted in the question I’ve also noticed that the whole login part (mainLayout) is centered vertical in relation to the whole screen, hence the attribute:

android:layout_centerVertical="true"

on the LinearLayout layout. And because mainLayout is inside a LinearLayout this means that that part does’t get resized (again see picture in question).

See also original question in stackoverflow

#70: Android: ScrollView vs NestedScrollView (Score: 186)

Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2019-03-22

Tags: android, xml, android-layout, android-scrollview, android-nestedscrollview

What is the difference between ScrollView and NestedScrollView? Both of them, extend FrameLayout. I want to know in depth pros and cons of both of them.

#70 Best answer 1 of Android: ScrollView vs NestedScrollView (Score: 243)

Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2018-07-07

NestedScrollView as the name suggests is used when there is a need for a scrolling view inside another scrolling view. Normally this would be difficult to accomplish since the system would be unable to decide which view to scroll.

This is where NestedScrollView comes in.

#70 Best answer 2 of Android: ScrollView vs NestedScrollView(Score: 43)

Created: 2017-08-11

In addition to the nested scrolling NestedScrollView added one major functionality, which could even make it interesting outside of nested contexts: It has build in support for OnScrollChangeListener. Adding a OnScrollChangeListener to the original ScrollView below API 23 required subclassing ScrollView or messing around with the ViewTreeObserver of the ScrollView which often means even more work than subclassing. With NestedScrollView it can be done using the build-in setter.

See also original question in stackoverflow


Notes:
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