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Most votes on android-layout questions 8

Most votes on android-layout questions 8. #71 Why not use always android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation"? #72 Android How to adjust layout in Full Screen Mode when softkeyboard is visible #73 What are the differences between LinearLayout, RelativeLayout, and AbsoluteLayout? #74 Font size of TextView in Android application changes on changing font size from native settings #75 Custom attributes in styles.xml #76 Set the absolute position of a view #77 Disable soft keyboard on NumberPicker #78 Gridview with two columns and auto resized images #79 Android layout replacing a view with another view on run time #80 How can I change default dialog button text color in android 5

Read all the top votes questions and answers in a single page.

#71: Why not use always android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation"? (Score: 186)

Created: 2011-10-19 Last updated: 2011-11-06

Tags: android, android-layout

I was wondering why not use android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation" in every (almost every ;)) activity?

Goods:

  • no need to worry about your activity been rotated
  • it’s faster

Not so nice:

  • need to change your layouts if they are depending on screen size (e.g. layouts with two columns or so)

Bad:

  • no flexible way to have different layouts on different orientation
  • not so good when using fragments

But if we don’t use different layouts, why not?

#71 Best answer 1 of Why not use always android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation"? (Score: 342)

Created: 2011-11-03 Last updated: 2019-11-05

Quick Background

By default, when certain key configuration changes happen on Android (a common example is an orientation change), Android fully restarts the running Activity to help it adjust to such changes.

When you define android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation" in your AndroidManifest, you are telling Android: “Please don’t do the default reset when the keyboard is pulled out, or the phone is rotated; I want to handle this myself. Yes, I know what I’m doing”

Is this a good thing? We shall soon see…

No worries?

One of the pros you start with is that there is:

no need to worry about your activity been rotated

In many cases, people mistakenly believe that when they have an error that is being generated by an orientation change (“rotation”), they can simply fix it by putting in android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation".

However, android:configChanges=“keyboardHidden|orientation” is nothing more than a bandaid. In truth, there are many ways a configuration change can be triggered. For example, if the user selects a new language (i.e. the locale has changed), your activity will be restarted in the same way it does by an orientation change. If you want you can view a list of all the different types of config changes.

Edit: More importantly, though, as hackbod points out in the comments, your activity will also be restarted when your app is in the background and Android decides to free up some memory by killing it. When the user comes back to your app, Android will attempt to restart the activity in the same way it does if there was some other configuration change. If you can’t handle that - the user will not be happy…

In other words, using android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation" is not a solution for your “worries.” The right way is to code your activities so that they are happy with any restart Android throws at them. This is a good practice that will help you down the road, so get used to it.

So when should I use it?

As you mentioned there is a distinct advantage. Overwriting the default configuration change for a rotation by handling it yourself will speed things up. However, this speed does come with a price of convenience.

To put it simply, if you use the same layout for both portrait and landscape you’re in good shape by doing the overwrite. Instead of a full-blown reload of the activity, the views will simply shift around to fill the remaining space.

However, if for some reason you use a different layout when the device is in landscape, the fact that Android reloads your Activity is good because it will then load up the correct layout. [If you use the override on such an Activity, and want to do some magical re-layout at runtime… well, good luck - it’s far from simple]

Quick Summary

By all means, if android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation" is right for you, then use it. But PLEASE be sure to test what happens when something changes, because an orientation change is not the only way a full Activity restart can be triggered.

#71 Best answer 2 of Why not use always android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation"?(Score: 3)

Created: 2011-10-19

From my point of view: If the layout is the same in both landscape and portrait mode - you might aswell disable one of the two in your app.

The reason why I state this is that I as a user expect the app to provide me with some benefit, when I change orientation. If it doesn’t matter how I hold my phone, then I don’t need the choice.

Take for instance an app where you have a ListView, and upon clicking a ListItem you want to be shown a detailed view for that item. In landscape you would od this by dividing the screen in two, having the ListView on the left and the detailed view on the right. In Portrait you would have the list in one screen and then change the screen to the detailed view when a ListItem is selected. In that case orientation change makes sense as well as different layouts.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#72: Android How to adjust layout in Full Screen Mode when softkeyboard is visible (Score: 185)

Created: 2011-09-14

Tags: android, android-layout, android-widget, android-softkeyboard

I have researched a lot to adjust the layout when softkeyboard is active and I have successfully implemented it but the problem comes when I use android:theme="@android:style/Theme.NoTitleBar.Fullscreen" this in my activity tag in manifest file.

For this I have used android:windowSoftInputMode="adjustPan|adjustResize|stateHidden" with different options but no luck.

After that I implemented FullScreen programmatically and tried various layout to work with FullScreen but all in vain.

I referred these links and have looked many posts here related to this issue:

http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2009/04/updating-applications-for-on-screen.html

http://davidwparker.com/2011/08/30/android-how-to-float-a-row-above-keyboard/

Here is xml code:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout android:id="@+id/masterContainerView"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="fill_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:background="#ffffff">

    <ScrollView android:id="@+id/parentScrollView"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="wrap_content">

        <LinearLayout android:layout_width="fill_parent"
            android:layout_height="fill_parent" android:orientation="vertical">

            <TextView android:id="@+id/setup_txt" android:layout_width="wrap_content"
                android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:text="Setup - Step 1 of 3"
                android:textColor="@color/top_header_txt_color" android:textSize="20dp"
                android:padding="8dp" android:gravity="center_horizontal" />

            <TextView android:id="@+id/txt_header" android:layout_width="fill_parent"
                android:layout_height="40dp" android:text="AutoReply:"
                android:textColor="@color/top_header_txt_color" android:textSize="14dp"
                android:textStyle="bold" android:padding="10dp"
                android:layout_below="@+id/setup_txt" />

            <EditText android:id="@+id/edit_message"
                android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:text="Some text here." android:textSize="16dp"
                android:textColor="@color/setting_editmsg_color" android:padding="10dp"
                android:minLines="5" android:maxLines="6" android:layout_below="@+id/txt_header"
                android:gravity="top" android:scrollbars="vertical"
                android:maxLength="132" />

            <ImageView android:id="@+id/image_bottom"
                android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="wrap_content"
                android:layout_below="@+id/edit_message" />

        </LinearLayout>
    </ScrollView>

    <RelativeLayout android:id="@+id/scoringContainerView"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent" android:layout_height="50px"
        android:orientation="vertical" android:layout_alignParentBottom="true"
        android:background="#535254">

        <Button android:id="@+id/btn_save" android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:layout_alignParentRight="true"
            android:layout_marginTop="7dp" android:layout_marginRight="15dp"
            android:layout_below="@+id/edit_message"
            android:text = "Save" />

        <Button android:id="@+id/btn_cancel" android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:layout_marginTop="7dp"
            android:layout_marginRight="10dp" android:layout_below="@+id/edit_message"
            android:layout_toLeftOf="@+id/btn_save" android:text = "Cancel" />

    </RelativeLayout>
</RelativeLayout>

enter image description here

I want the bottom 2 buttons should go upward when the softkeyboard comes in picture.

enter image description here

#72 Best answer 1 of Android How to adjust layout in Full Screen Mode when softkeyboard is visible (Score: 269)

Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2017-09-10

Based on yghm’s workaround, I coded up a convenience class that allows me to solve the problem with a one-liner (after adding the new class to my source code of course). The one-liner is:

     AndroidBug5497Workaround.assistActivity(this);

And the implementation class is:


public class AndroidBug5497Workaround {
    
    // For more information, see https://issuetracker.google.com/issues/36911528
    // To use this class, simply invoke assistActivity() on an Activity that already has its content view set.

    public static void assistActivity (Activity activity) {
        new AndroidBug5497Workaround(activity);
    }
    
    private View mChildOfContent;
    private int usableHeightPrevious;
    private FrameLayout.LayoutParams frameLayoutParams;

    private AndroidBug5497Workaround(Activity activity) {
        FrameLayout content = (FrameLayout) activity.findViewById(android.R.id.content);
        mChildOfContent = content.getChildAt(0);
        mChildOfContent.getViewTreeObserver().addOnGlobalLayoutListener(new ViewTreeObserver.OnGlobalLayoutListener() {
            public void onGlobalLayout() {
                possiblyResizeChildOfContent();
            }
        });
        frameLayoutParams = (FrameLayout.LayoutParams) mChildOfContent.getLayoutParams();
    }

    private void possiblyResizeChildOfContent() {
        int usableHeightNow = computeUsableHeight();
        if (usableHeightNow != usableHeightPrevious) {
            int usableHeightSansKeyboard = mChildOfContent.getRootView().getHeight();
            int heightDifference = usableHeightSansKeyboard - usableHeightNow;
            if (heightDifference > (usableHeightSansKeyboard/4)) {
                // keyboard probably just became visible
                frameLayoutParams.height = usableHeightSansKeyboard - heightDifference;
            } else {
                // keyboard probably just became hidden
                frameLayoutParams.height = usableHeightSansKeyboard;
            }
            mChildOfContent.requestLayout();
            usableHeightPrevious = usableHeightNow;
        }
    }

    private int computeUsableHeight() {
        Rect r = new Rect();
        mChildOfContent.getWindowVisibleDisplayFrame(r);
        return (r.bottom - r.top);
    }
}

Hope this helps someone.

#72 Best answer 2 of Android How to adjust layout in Full Screen Mode when softkeyboard is visible(Score: 41)

Created: 2012-06-08 Last updated: 2017-05-23

Since the answer has already been picked and problem known to be a bug, I thought I would add a “Possible Work Around”.

You can toggle fullScreen mode when soft keyboard is shown. This allows the “adjustPan” to work correctly.

In other words, I still use @android:style/Theme.Black.NoTitleBar.Fullscreen as part of the application theme and stateVisible|adjustResize as part of the activity window soft input mode but to get them to work together I must toggle fullscreen mode before the keyboard comes up.

Use the following Code:

Turn Off full screen mode

getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_FORCE_NOT_FULLSCREEN);
getWindow().clearFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_FULLSCREEN);

Turn On full screen mode

getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_FULLSCREEN);
getWindow().clearFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_FORCE_NOT_FULLSCREEN);

Note - inspiration came from: Hiding Title in a Fullscreen mode

See also original question in stackoverflow

#73: What are the differences between LinearLayout, RelativeLayout, and AbsoluteLayout? (Score: 185)

Created: 2011-02-05 Last updated: 2016-11-04

Tags: android, android-layout, android-linearlayout, android-relativelayout, android-framelayout

I am confused about the difference between LinearLayout, RelativeLayout, and AbsoluteLayout. Could someone please tell me the exact differences between them?

#73 Best answer 1 of What are the differences between LinearLayout, RelativeLayout, and AbsoluteLayout? (Score: 220)

Created: 2011-02-05 Last updated: 2018-05-30

LinearLayout means you can align views one by one (vertically/ horizontally).

RelativeLayout means based on relation of views from its parents and other views.

ConstraintLayout is similar to a RelativeLayout in that it uses relations to position and size widgets, but has additional flexibility and is easier to use in the Layout Editor.

WebView to load html, static or dynamic pages.

FrameLayout to load child one above another, like cards inside a frame, we can place one above another or anywhere inside the frame.

deprecated - AbsoluteLayout means you have to give exact position where the view should be.

For more information, please check this address https://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/declaring-layout#CommonLayouts

#73 Best answer 2 of What are the differences between LinearLayout, RelativeLayout, and AbsoluteLayout?(Score: 51)

Created: 2014-09-13 Last updated: 2020-06-20

Definitions:

  • Frame Layout: This is designed to block out an area on the screen to display a single item.
  • Linear Layout: A layout that arranges its children in a single column or a single row.
  • Relative Layout: This layout is a view group that displays child views in relative positions.
  • Table Layout: A layout that arranges its children into rows and columns.

More Information:

FrameLayout

FrameLayout is designed to block out an area on the screen to display a single item. Generally, FrameLayout should be used to hold a single child view, because it can be difficult to organize child views in a way that’s scalable to different screen sizes without the children overlapping each other. You can, however, add multiple children to a FrameLayout and control their position within the FrameLayout by assigning gravity to each child, using the android:layout_gravity attribute.

Child views are drawn in a stack, with the most recently added child on top. The size of the FrameLayout is the size of its largest child (plus padding), visible or not (if the FrameLayout’s parent permits).

RelativeLayout

A RelativeLayout is a very powerful utility for designing a user interface because it can eliminate nested view groups and keep your layout hierarchy flat, which improves performance. If you find yourself using several nested LinearLayout groups, you may be able to replace them with a single RelativeLayout.

(Current docs here)

TableLayout

A TableLayout consists of a number of TableRow objects, each defining a row (actually, you can have other children, which will be explained below). TableLayout containers do not display border lines for their rows, columns, or cells. Each row has zero or more cells; each cell can hold one View object. The table has as many columns as the row with the most cells. A table can leave cells empty. Cells can span columns, as they can in HTML.

The width of a column is defined by the row with the widest cell in that column.


Note: Absolute Layout is deprecated.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#74: Font size of TextView in Android application changes on changing font size from native settings (Score: 184)

Created: 2012-11-07 Last updated: 2014-10-01

Tags: android, android-layout, textview, android-fonts

I want to specify my own text size in my application, but I am having a problem doing this.

When I change the font size in the device settings, the font size of my application TextView also changes.

#74 Best answer 1 of Font size of TextView in Android application changes on changing font size from native settings (Score: 247)

Created: 2012-11-07 Last updated: 2018-05-31

Actually, Settings font size affects only sizes in sp. So all You need to do - define textSize in dp instead of sp, then settings won’t change text size in Your app.

Here’s a link to the documentation: Dimensions

However please note that the expected behavior is that the fonts in all apps respect the user’s preferences. There are many reasons a user might want to adjust the font sizes and some of them might even be medical - visually impaired users. Using dp instead of sp for text might lead to unwillingly discriminating against some of your app’s users.

i.e:

android:textSize="32dp"

#74 Best answer 2 of Font size of TextView in Android application changes on changing font size from native settings(Score: 130)

Created: 2013-08-24 Last updated: 2013-08-24

The easiest to do so is simply to use something like the following:

android:textSize="32sp"

If you’d like to know more about the textSize property, you can check the Android developer documentation.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#75: Custom attributes in styles.xml (Score: 184)

Created: 2011-07-28 Last updated: 2016-03-04

Tags: android, android-layout, android-xml, android-styles

I have created a custom widget, and I’m declaring it in layout.xml. I have also added some custom attributes in attr.xml. However, when trying to declare these attributes in a style in styles.xml, it’s giving me No resource found that matches the given name: attr 'custom:attribute'.

I have put the xmlns:custom="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/com.my.package" in all of the tags in styles.xml, including <?xml>, <resources>, and <style>, but it still gives me the same error, that it can’t find my custom XML namespace.

I can, however, use my namespace to manually assign attributes to the view in my layout.xml, so there is nothing wrong with the namespace. My issue lies in making styles.xml aware of my attr.xml.

#75 Best answer 1 of Custom attributes in styles.xml (Score: 366)

Created: 2011-07-29 Last updated: 2018-01-26

I figured it out! The answer is to NOT specify the namespace in the style.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<resources xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
    <style name="CustomStyle">
        <item name="android:layout_width">wrap_content</item>
        <item name="android:layout_height">wrap_content</item>

        <item name="custom_attr">value</item> <!-- tee hee -->
    </style>
</resources>

#75 Best answer 2 of Custom attributes in styles.xml(Score: 44)

Created: 2013-05-07

above answer is worked for me, I tried a litte change, I declare styleable for a class in resources element.

<declare-styleable name="VerticalView">
    <attr name="textSize" format="dimension" />
    <attr name="textColor" format="color" />
    <attr name="textBold" format="boolean" />
</declare-styleable>

in declare-styleable, the name attribute referenced a class name, so I had a view class call “com.my.package.name.VerticalView”, it represented this declare must be use in VerticalView or subclasses of VerticalView. so we can declare style like this :

<resources>
    <style name="verticalViewStyle">
        <item name="android:layout_width">match_parent</item>
        <item name="android:layout_height">36dip</item>

        <item name="textSize">28sp</item>  <!-- not namespace prefix -->
        <item name="textColor">#ff666666</item>
        <item name="textBold">true</item>
    </style>
</resources>

that’s why we didn’t declare namespace at resources element, it still work.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#76: Set the absolute position of a view (Score: 184)

Created: 2010-07-20 Last updated: 2016-03-03

Tags: android, android-layout, layout, view, position

Is it possible to set the absolute position of a view in Android? (I know that there is an AbsoluteLayout, but it’s deprecated…)

For example, if I have a 240x320px screen, how could I add an ImageView which is 20x20px such that its center is at the position (100,100)?

#76 Best answer 1 of Set the absolute position of a view (Score: 279)

Created: 2010-07-20 Last updated: 2010-07-21

You can use RelativeLayout. Let’s say you wanted a 30x40 ImageView at position (50,60) inside your layout. Somewhere in your activity:

// Some existing RelativeLayout from your layout xml
RelativeLayout rl = (RelativeLayout) findViewById(R.id.my_relative_layout);

ImageView iv = new ImageView(this);

RelativeLayout.LayoutParams params = new RelativeLayout.LayoutParams(30, 40);
params.leftMargin = 50;
params.topMargin = 60;
rl.addView(iv, params);

More examples:

Places two 30x40 ImageViews (one yellow, one red) at (50,60) and (80,90), respectively:

RelativeLayout rl = (RelativeLayout) findViewById(R.id.my_relative_layout);
ImageView iv;
RelativeLayout.LayoutParams params;

iv = new ImageView(this);
iv.setBackgroundColor(Color.YELLOW);
params = new RelativeLayout.LayoutParams(30, 40);
params.leftMargin = 50;
params.topMargin = 60;
rl.addView(iv, params);

iv = new ImageView(this);
iv.setBackgroundColor(Color.RED);
params = new RelativeLayout.LayoutParams(30, 40);
params.leftMargin = 80;
params.topMargin = 90;
rl.addView(iv, params);

Places one 30x40 yellow ImageView at (50,60) and another 30x40 red ImageView <80,90> relative to the yellow ImageView:

RelativeLayout rl = (RelativeLayout) findViewById(R.id.my_relative_layout);
ImageView iv;
RelativeLayout.LayoutParams params;

int yellow_iv_id = 123; // Some arbitrary ID value.

iv = new ImageView(this);
iv.setId(yellow_iv_id);
iv.setBackgroundColor(Color.YELLOW);
params = new RelativeLayout.LayoutParams(30, 40);
params.leftMargin = 50;
params.topMargin = 60;
rl.addView(iv, params);

iv = new ImageView(this);
iv.setBackgroundColor(Color.RED);
params = new RelativeLayout.LayoutParams(30, 40);
params.leftMargin = 80;
params.topMargin = 90;

// This line defines how params.leftMargin and params.topMargin are interpreted.
// In this case, "<80,90>" means <80,90> to the right of the yellow ImageView.
params.addRule(RelativeLayout.RIGHT_OF, yellow_iv_id);

rl.addView(iv, params);

#76 Best answer 2 of Set the absolute position of a view(Score: 71)

Created: 2015-01-07

In general, you can add a View in a specific position using a FrameLayout as container by specifying the leftMargin and topMargin attributes.

The following example will place a 20x20px ImageView at position (100,200) using a FrameLayout as fullscreen container:

XML

<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:id="@+id/root"
    android:background="#33AAFF"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent" >
</FrameLayout>

Activity / Fragment / Custom view

//...
FrameLayout root = (FrameLayout)findViewById(R.id.root);
ImageView img = new ImageView(this);
img.setBackgroundColor(Color.RED);
//..load something inside the ImageView, we just set the background color

FrameLayout.LayoutParams params = new FrameLayout.LayoutParams(20, 20);
params.leftMargin = 100;
params.topMargin  = 200;
root.addView(img, params);
//...

This will do the trick because margins can be used as absolute (X,Y) coordinates without a RelativeLayout:

enter image description here

See also original question in stackoverflow

#77: Disable soft keyboard on NumberPicker (Score: 182)

Created: 2012-01-13

Tags: android, android-layout, android-widget, android-edittext, android-softkeyboard

I’m trying to deactivate the soft keyboard when using a NumberPicker to enter numerical values (for aesthetic reasons). This is my layout-xml-code:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <LinearLayout
        android:id="@+id/linearLayout2"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal"
        android:layout_marginBottom="30dp"
        android:layout_marginTop="30dp" >

        <NumberPicker
            android:id="@+id/repetitionPicker"
            android:layout_width="40dp"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

        <TextView
            android:id="@+id/textView1"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_gravity="center_vertical"
            android:text="@string/repetitions_short_divider"
            android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium" />

        <NumberPicker
            android:id="@+id/weightPicker"
            android:layout_width="40dp"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_marginLeft="40dp" />

        <TextView
            android:id="@+id/textView2"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_gravity="center_vertical"
            android:text="@string/pounds"
            android:textAppearance="?android:attr/textAppearanceMedium" />
    </LinearLayout>


    <Button
        android:id="@+id/saveButton"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal"
        android:text="@string/save" />

</LinearLayout>

And finally this is the code where I try to block the keyboard in the onCreate()-method:

// hide keyboard
View.OnClickListener disableKeyBoardListener = new View.OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {
        ((InputMethodManager) getSystemService(Context.INPUT_METHOD_SERVICE))
                .hideSoftInputFromWindow(v.getWindowToken(), InputMethodManager.HIDE_NOT_ALWAYS);
    }
};

((EditText) weightPicker.getChildAt(1)).setInputType(InputType.TYPE_NULL);
((EditText) repetitionPicker.getChildAt(1)).setInputType(InputType.TYPE_NULL);

((EditText) weightPicker.getChildAt(1)).setOnClickListener(disableKeyBoardListener);
//((EditText) repetitionPicker.getChildAt(1)).setOnClickListener(disableKeyBoardListener);
//weightPicker.setOnClickListener(disableKeyBoardListener);
//repetitionPicker.setOnClickListener(disableKeyBoardListener);		

getWindow().setSoftInputMode(
        WindowManager.LayoutParams.SOFT_INPUT_STATE_ALWAYS_HIDDEN); 

Sadly, the soft keyboard still shows up when clicking on a NumberPicker. Any ideas?

#77 Best answer 1 of Disable soft keyboard on NumberPicker (Score: 497)

Created: 2012-02-03 Last updated: 2017-05-08

Just found this and it works like a charm:

myNumberPicker.setDescendantFocusability(NumberPicker.FOCUS_BLOCK_DESCENDANTS);

You can also set this in XML:

android:descendantFocusability="blocksDescendants" 

#77 Best answer 2 of Disable soft keyboard on NumberPicker(Score: 57)

Created: 2015-08-01

Xml version of Andrew Webber’s answer

android:descendantFocusability="blocksDescendants"

Example

<NumberPicker
        android:id="@+id/your_numberpicker"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:descendantFocusability="blocksDescendants"/>

See also original question in stackoverflow

#78: Gridview with two columns and auto resized images (Score: 182)

Created: 2013-03-07 Last updated: 2013-07-02

Tags: android, android-layout, android-gridview

I’m trying to make a gridview with two columns. I mean two photos per row side by side just like this image.

enter image description here

But my pictures have spaces between them, due to the fact that it’s not the same size. Here is what I’m getting.

enter image description here

as you can see the first picture hides the legend which shows the contact name and phone number. and the other pictures are not stretched correctly.

Here is my GridView xml file. As you can see the columnWidth is set to 200dp. I’d like it to be automatic, so the pictures will resize automatically for each screen size.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<GridView 
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/gridViewContacts"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent" 
    android:layout_height="fill_parent"
    android:numColumns="2"
    android:columnWidth="200dp"
    android:stretchMode="columnWidth"    
    android:gravity="center" />

and here is the item xml file, which represents each item itself.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout 
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent" >
 
    <ImageView
        android:id="@+id/imageViewContactIcon"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:scaleType="fitXY" />
    
    <LinearLayout
        android:id="@+id/linearlayoutContactName"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:orientation="horizontal"
        android:paddingLeft="5dp"
        android:paddingTop="5dp"
        android:paddingBottom="5dp"
        android:background="#99000000"
        android:layout_alignBottom="@+id/imageViewContactIcon">
    
        <TextView
            android:id="@+id/textViewContactName"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:textColor="#FFFFFF"
            android:textStyle="bold"
            android:textSize="15sp"
            android:text="Lorem Ipsum" />       
        
        <TextView
            android:id="@+id/textViewContactNumber"
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:textColor="#FFFFFF"
            android:layout_marginLeft="5dp"
            android:focusable="true"
            android:ellipsize="marquee"
            android:marqueeRepeatLimit="marquee_forever"
            android:textSize="10sp"
            android:text="123456789" />
 		
    </LinearLayout>
 
</RelativeLayout>

So what I want, is to show two images per row, and the images auto resized, no matter the screen size. What am I doing wrong on my layout?

Thanks.

#78 Best answer 1 of Gridview with two columns and auto resized images (Score: 403)

Created: 2013-03-07 Last updated: 2015-02-10

Here’s a relatively easy method to do this. Throw a GridView into your layout, setting the stretch mode to stretch the column widths, set the spacing to 0 (or whatever you want), and set the number of columns to 2:

res/layout/main.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<FrameLayout 
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent">

    <GridView
        android:id="@+id/gridview"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:verticalSpacing="0dp"
        android:horizontalSpacing="0dp"
        android:stretchMode="columnWidth"
        android:numColumns="2"/>

</FrameLayout>

Make a custom ImageView that maintains its aspect ratio:

src/com/example/graphicstest/SquareImageView.java

public class SquareImageView extends ImageView {
    public SquareImageView(Context context) {
        super(context);
    }

    public SquareImageView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        super(context, attrs);
    }

    public SquareImageView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {
        super(context, attrs, defStyle);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onMeasure(int widthMeasureSpec, int heightMeasureSpec) {
        super.onMeasure(widthMeasureSpec, heightMeasureSpec);
        setMeasuredDimension(getMeasuredWidth(), getMeasuredWidth()); //Snap to width
    }
}

Make a layout for a grid item using this SquareImageView and set the scaleType to centerCrop:

res/layout/grid_item.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
             android:layout_width="match_parent"
             android:layout_height="match_parent">

    <com.example.graphicstest.SquareImageView
        android:id="@+id/picture"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:scaleType="centerCrop"/>

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/text"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:paddingLeft="10dp"
        android:paddingRight="10dp"
        android:paddingTop="15dp"
        android:paddingBottom="15dp"
        android:layout_gravity="bottom"
        android:textColor="@android:color/white"
        android:background="#55000000"/>

</FrameLayout>

Now make some sort of adapter for your GridView:

src/com/example/graphicstest/MyAdapter.java

private final class MyAdapter extends BaseAdapter {
    private final List<Item> mItems = new ArrayList<Item>();
    private final LayoutInflater mInflater;

    public MyAdapter(Context context) {
        mInflater = LayoutInflater.from(context);

        mItems.add(new Item("Red",       R.drawable.red));
        mItems.add(new Item("Magenta",   R.drawable.magenta));
        mItems.add(new Item("Dark Gray", R.drawable.dark_gray));
        mItems.add(new Item("Gray",      R.drawable.gray));
        mItems.add(new Item("Green",     R.drawable.green));
        mItems.add(new Item("Cyan",      R.drawable.cyan));
    }

    @Override
    public int getCount() {
        return mItems.size();
    }

    @Override
    public Item getItem(int i) {
        return mItems.get(i);
    }

    @Override
    public long getItemId(int i) {
        return mItems.get(i).drawableId;
    }

    @Override
    public View getView(int i, View view, ViewGroup viewGroup) {
        View v = view;
        ImageView picture;
        TextView name;

        if (v == null) {
            v = mInflater.inflate(R.layout.grid_item, viewGroup, false);
            v.setTag(R.id.picture, v.findViewById(R.id.picture));
            v.setTag(R.id.text, v.findViewById(R.id.text));
        }

        picture = (ImageView) v.getTag(R.id.picture);
        name = (TextView) v.getTag(R.id.text);

        Item item = getItem(i);

        picture.setImageResource(item.drawableId);
        name.setText(item.name);

        return v;
    }

    private static class Item {
        public final String name;
        public final int drawableId;

        Item(String name, int drawableId) {
            this.name = name;
            this.drawableId = drawableId;
        }
    }
}

Set that adapter to your GridView:

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);
    GridView gridView = (GridView)findViewById(R.id.gridview);
    gridView.setAdapter(new MyAdapter(this));
}

And enjoy the results:

Example GridView

#78 Best answer 2 of Gridview with two columns and auto resized images(Score: 14)

Created: 2015-09-19

another simple approach with modern built-in stuff like PercentRelativeLayout is now available for new users who hit this problem. thanks to android team for release this item.

<android.support.percent.PercentRelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="match_parent"
android:clickable="true"
app:layout_widthPercent="50%">

<FrameLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent">

    <ImageView
        android:id="@+id/picture"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:scaleType="centerCrop" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/text"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_gravity="bottom"
        android:background="#55000000"
        android:paddingBottom="15dp"
        android:paddingLeft="10dp"
        android:paddingRight="10dp"
        android:paddingTop="15dp"
        android:textColor="@android:color/white" />

</FrameLayout>

and for better performance you can use some stuff like picasso image loader which help you to fill whole width of every image parents. for example in your adapter you should use this:

int width= context.getResources().getDisplayMetrics().widthPixels;
    com.squareup.picasso.Picasso
            .with(context)
            .load("some url")
            .centerCrop().resize(width/2,width/2)
            .error(R.drawable.placeholder)
            .placeholder(R.drawable.placeholder)
            .into(item.drawableId);

now you dont need CustomImageView Class anymore.

P.S i recommend to use ImageView in place of Type Int in class Item.

hope this help..

See also original question in stackoverflow

#79: Android layout replacing a view with another view on run time (Score: 181)

Created: 2010-07-26 Last updated: 2020-06-27

Tags: android, xml, android-layout, view

I have a xml-layout file main with two textviews A/B and a view C. I have two other xml-layout files option1 and option2. Is it possible to load either option1 or option2 in run time via Java into C? If so, what function do I have to use?

#79 Best answer 1 of Android layout replacing a view with another view on run time (Score: 380)

Created: 2010-09-21 Last updated: 2017-01-04

You could replace any view at any time.

int optionId = someExpression ? R.layout.option1 : R.layout.option2;

View C = findViewById(R.id.C);
ViewGroup parent = (ViewGroup) C.getParent();
int index = parent.indexOfChild(C);
parent.removeView(C);
C = getLayoutInflater().inflate(optionId, parent, false);
parent.addView(C, index);

If you don’t want to replace already existing View, but choose between option1/option2 at initialization time, then you could do this easier: set android:id for parent layout and then:

ViewGroup parent = (ViewGroup) findViewById(R.id.parent);
View C = getLayoutInflater().inflate(optionId, parent, false);
parent.addView(C, index);

You will have to set “index” to proper value depending on views structure. You could also use a ViewStub: add your C view as ViewStub and then:

ViewStub C = (ViewStub) findViewById(R.id.C);
C.setLayoutResource(optionId);
C.inflate();

That way you won’t have to worry about above “index” value if you will want to restructure your XML layout.

#79 Best answer 2 of Android layout replacing a view with another view on run time(Score: 43)

Created: 2011-05-05 Last updated: 2014-12-12

And if you do that very often, you could use a ViewSwitcher or a ViewFlipper to ease view substitution.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#80: How can I change default dialog button text color in android 5 (Score: 180)

Created: 2015-01-15 Last updated: 2019-06-27

Tags: android, android-layout, android-5.0-lollipop, android-alertdialog, textcolor

I have many alert dialogs in my app. It is a default layout but I am adding positive and negative buttons to the dialog. So the buttons get the default text color of Android 5 (green). I tried to changed it without success. Any idea how to change that text color?

My Custom dialog:

public class MyCustomDialog extends AlertDialog.Builder {

    public MyCustomDialog(Context context,String title,String message) {
        super(context);

        LayoutInflater inflater = (LayoutInflater) context.getSystemService( Context.LAYOUT_INFLATER_SERVICE );
        View viewDialog = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialog_simple, null, false);

        TextView titleTextView = (TextView)viewDialog.findViewById(R.id.title);
        titleTextView.setText(title);
        TextView messageTextView = (TextView)viewDialog.findViewById(R.id.message);
        messageTextView.setText(message);

        this.setCancelable(false);

        this.setView(viewDialog);

    } }

Creating the dialog:

MyCustomDialog builder = new MyCustomDialog(getActivity(), "Try Again", errorMessage);
builder.setNegativeButton("OK", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                        @Override
                        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialogInterface, int i) {
                            ...
                        }
}).show();

That negativeButton is a default dialog button and takes the default green color from Android 5 Lollipop.

Many thanks

Custom dialog with green button

#80 Best answer 1 of How can I change default dialog button text color in android 5 (Score: 327)

Created: 2017-02-21 Last updated: 2019-05-17

Here’s a natural way to do it with styles:

If your AppTheme is inherited from Theme.MaterialComponents, then:

<style name="AlertDialogTheme" parent="ThemeOverlay.MaterialComponents.Dialog.Alert">
    <item name="buttonBarNegativeButtonStyle">@style/NegativeButtonStyle</item>
    <item name="buttonBarPositiveButtonStyle">@style/PositiveButtonStyle</item>
</style>

<style name="NegativeButtonStyle" parent="Widget.MaterialComponents.Button.TextButton.Dialog">
    <item name="android:textColor">#f00</item>
</style>

<style name="PositiveButtonStyle" parent="Widget.MaterialComponents.Button.TextButton.Dialog">
    <item name="android:textColor">#00f</item>
</style>

If your AppTheme is inherited from Theme.AppCompat:

<style name="AlertDialogTheme" parent="ThemeOverlay.AppCompat.Dialog.Alert">
    <item name="buttonBarNegativeButtonStyle">@style/NegativeButtonStyle</item>
    <item name="buttonBarPositiveButtonStyle">@style/PositiveButtonStyle</item>
</style>

<style name="NegativeButtonStyle" parent="Widget.AppCompat.Button.ButtonBar.AlertDialog">
    <item name="android:textColor">#f00</item>
</style>

<style name="PositiveButtonStyle" parent="Widget.AppCompat.Button.ButtonBar.AlertDialog">
    <item name="android:textColor">#00f</item>
</style>

Use your AlertDialogTheme in your AppTheme

<item name="alertDialogTheme">@style/AlertDialogTheme</item>

or in constructor

androidx.appcompat.app.AlertDialog.Builder(context, R.style.AlertDialogTheme)

#80 Best answer 2 of How can I change default dialog button text color in android 5(Score: 210)

Created: 2015-01-15 Last updated: 2017-12-29

You can try to create the AlertDialog object first, and then use it to set up to change the color of the button and then show it. (Note that on builder object instead of calling show() we call create() to get the AlertDialog object:

//1. create a dialog object 'dialog'
MyCustomDialog builder = new MyCustomDialog(getActivity(), "Try Again", errorMessage); 
AlertDialog dialog = builder.setNegativeButton("OK", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialogInterface, int i) {
                    ...
                }

            }).create();

//2. now setup to change color of the button
dialog.setOnShowListener( new OnShowListener() {
    @Override
    public void onShow(DialogInterface arg0) {
        dialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_NEGATIVE).setTextColor(COLOR_I_WANT);
    }
});

dialog.show()

The reason you have to do it on onShow() and cannot just get that button after you create your dialog is that the button would not have been created yet.

I changed AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE to AlertDialog.BUTTON_NEGATIVE to reflect the change in your question. Although it is odd that “OK” button would be a negative button. Usually it is the positive button.

See also original question in stackoverflow


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