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Most votes on android questions 5

Most votes on android questions 5. #41 Android "Only the original thread that created a view hierarchy can touch its views." #42 How do I rotate the Android emulator display? #43 How to manage startActivityForResult on Android? #44 How to add dividers and spaces between items in RecyclerView? #45 Static way to get 'Context' in Android? #46 How to convert a Drawable to a Bitmap? #47 Why doesn't RecyclerView have onItemClickListener()? #48 Can't start Eclipse - Java was started but returned exit code=13 #49 How to check if a service is running on Android? #50 Ship an application with a database

Read all the top votes questions and answers in a single page.

#41: Android "Only the original thread that created a view hierarchy can touch its views." (Score: 1048)

Created: 2011-03-02 Last updated: 2017-12-10

Tags: android, multithreading

I’ve built a simple music player in Android. The view for each song contains a SeekBar, implemented like this:

public class Song extends Activity implements OnClickListener,Runnable {
	private SeekBar progress;
    private MediaPlayer mp;
    
    // ...

    private ServiceConnection onService = new ServiceConnection() {
          public void onServiceConnected(ComponentName className,
            IBinder rawBinder) {
              appService = ((MPService.LocalBinder)rawBinder).getService(); // service that handles the MediaPlayer
              progress.setVisibility(SeekBar.VISIBLE);
              progress.setProgress(0);
              mp = appService.getMP();
              appService.playSong(title);
              progress.setMax(mp.getDuration());
              new Thread(Song.this).start();
          }
          public void onServiceDisconnected(ComponentName classname) {
              appService = null;
          }
    };

    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.song);

        // ...

        progress = (SeekBar) findViewById(R.id.progress);

        // ...
    }

    public void run() {
    int pos = 0;
    int total = mp.getDuration();
    while (mp != null && pos<total) {
        try {
            Thread.sleep(1000);
            pos = appService.getSongPosition();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            return;
        } catch (Exception e) {
            return;
        }
        progress.setProgress(pos);
    }
}

This works fine. Now I want a timer counting the seconds/minutes of the progress of the song. So I put a TextView in the layout, get it with findViewById() in onCreate(), and put this in run() after progress.setProgress(pos):

String time = String.format("%d:%d",
            TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(pos),
            TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(pos),
            TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(
                    pos))
            );
currentTime.setText(time);  // currentTime = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.current_time);

But that last line gives me the exception:

android.view.ViewRoot$CalledFromWrongThreadException: Only the original thread that created a view hierarchy can touch its views.

Yet I’m doing basically the same thing here as I’m doing with the SeekBar - creating the view in onCreate, then touching it in run() - and it doesn’t give me this complaint.

#41 Best answer 1 of Android "Only the original thread that created a view hierarchy can touch its views." (Score: 2077)

Created: 2011-03-02 Last updated: 2018-04-22

You have to move the portion of the background task that updates the UI onto the main thread. There is a simple piece of code for this:

runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {

    @Override
    public void run() {

        // Stuff that updates the UI

    }
});

Documentation for Activity.runOnUiThread.

Just nest this inside the method that is running in the background, and then copy paste the code that implements any updates in the middle of the block. Include only the smallest amount of code possible, otherwise you start to defeat the purpose of the background thread.

#41 Best answer 2 of Android "Only the original thread that created a view hierarchy can touch its views."(Score: 151)

Created: 2013-01-01 Last updated: 2016-08-17

I solved this by putting runOnUiThread( new Runnable(){ .. inside run():

thread = new Thread(){
        @Override
        public void run() {
            try {
                synchronized (this) {
                    wait(5000);
					
                    runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
                        @Override
                        public void run() {
                            dbloadingInfo.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
                            bar.setVisibility(View.INVISIBLE);
                            loadingText.setVisibility(View.INVISIBLE);
                        }
                    });
					
                }
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            Intent mainActivity = new Intent(getApplicationContext(),MainActivity.class);
            startActivity(mainActivity);
        };
	};	
	thread.start();

See also original question in stackoverflow

#42: How do I rotate the Android emulator display? (Score: 1044)

Created: 2010-12-26 Last updated: 2016-09-25

Tags: android, android-emulator, emulation

How can I rotate the Android emulator display to see it in landscape mode?

#42 Best answer 1 of How do I rotate the Android emulator display? (Score: 1197)

Created: 2010-12-26 Last updated: 2020-04-19

Windows: left Ctrl + F12

Mac: Fn + Ctrl + F12

#42 Best answer 2 of How do I rotate the Android emulator display?(Score: 360)

Created: 2010-12-26 Last updated: 2015-11-09

  • Linux: CTRL + F12
  • Mac: Fn + CTRL + F12
  • Windows: Left CTRL + F11 or Left CTRL + F12

See also original question in stackoverflow

#43: How to manage startActivityForResult on Android? (Score: 1029)

Created: 2012-05-02 Last updated: 2020-03-13

Tags: android, android-intent, android-activity, startactivityforresult

In my activity, I’m calling a second activity from the main activity by startActivityForResult. In my second activity, there are some methods that finish this activity (maybe without a result), however, just one of them returns a result.

For example, from the main activity, I call a second one. In this activity, I’m checking some features of handset such as does it have a camera. If it doesn’t have then I’ll close this activity. Also, during the preparation of MediaRecorder or MediaPlayer if a problem happens then I’ll close this activity.

If its device has a camera and recording is done completely, then after recording a video if a user clicks on the done button then I’ll send the result (address of the recorded video) back to the main activity.

How do I check the result from the main activity?

#43 Best answer 1 of How to manage startActivityForResult on Android? (Score: 2559)

Created: 2012-05-02 Last updated: 2020-06-03

From your FirstActivity call the SecondActivity using startActivityForResult() method

For example:

int LAUNCH_SECOND_ACTIVITY = 1
Intent i = new Intent(this, SecondActivity.class);
startActivityForResult(i, LAUNCH_SECOND_ACTIVITY);

In your SecondActivity set the data which you want to return back to FirstActivity. If you don’t want to return back, don’t set any.

For example: In SecondActivity if you want to send back data:

Intent returnIntent = new Intent();
returnIntent.putExtra("result",result);
setResult(Activity.RESULT_OK,returnIntent);
finish();

If you don’t want to return data:

Intent returnIntent = new Intent();
setResult(Activity.RESULT_CANCELED, returnIntent);
finish();

Now in your FirstActivity class write following code for the onActivityResult() method.

@Override
protected void onActivityResult(int requestCode, int resultCode, Intent data) {
    super.onActivityResult(requestCode, resultCode, data);

    if (requestCode == LAUNCH_SECOND_ACTIVITY) {
        if(resultCode == Activity.RESULT_OK){
            String result=data.getStringExtra("result");
        }
        if (resultCode == Activity.RESULT_CANCELED) {
            //Write your code if there's no result
        }
    }
}//onActivityResult

To implement passing data between two activities in much better way in Kotlin please go through this link ‘A better way to pass data between Activities

#43 Best answer 2 of How to manage startActivityForResult on Android?(Score: 53)

Created: 2012-05-02 Last updated: 2014-05-13

How to check the result from the main activity?

You need to override Activity.onActivityResult() then check its parameters:

  • requestCode identifies which app returned these results. This is defined by you when you call startActivityForResult().
  • resultCode informs you whether this app succeeded, failed, or something different
  • data holds any information returned by this app. This may be null.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#44: How to add dividers and spaces between items in RecyclerView? (Score: 1026)

Created: 2014-07-07 Last updated: 2016-08-23

Tags: android, android-recyclerview, divider

This is an example of how it could have been done previously in the ListView class, using the divider and dividerHeight parameters:

<ListView
    android:id="@+id/activity_home_list_view"
    android:layout_width="match_parent" 
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:divider="@android:color/transparent"
    android:dividerHeight="8dp"/>

However, I don’t see such possibility in the RecyclerView class.

<android.support.v7.widget.RecyclerView
    android:id="@+id/activity_home_recycler_view"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:scrollbars="vertical"/>

In that case, is it ok to define margins and/or add a custom divider view directly into a list item’s layout or is there a better way to achieve my goal?

#44 Best answer 1 of How to add dividers and spaces between items in RecyclerView? (Score: 1308)

Created: 2014-11-20 Last updated: 2020-06-20

October 2016 Update

The version 25.0.0 of Android Support Library introduced DividerItemDecoration class:

DividerItemDecoration is a RecyclerView.ItemDecoration that can be used as a divider between items of a LinearLayoutManager. It supports both HORIZONTAL and VERTICAL orientations.

Usage:

DividerItemDecoration dividerItemDecoration = new DividerItemDecoration(recyclerView.getContext(),
    layoutManager.getOrientation());
recyclerView.addItemDecoration(dividerItemDecoration);

Previous answer

Some answers either use methods that have since become deprecated, or don’t give a complete solution, so I tried to do a short, up-to-date wrap-up.


Unlike ListView, the RecyclerView class has no divider-related parameters. Instead, you need to extend ItemDecoration, a RecyclerView’s inner class:

An ItemDecoration allows the application to add a special drawing and layout offset to specific item views from the adapter’s data set. This can be useful for drawing dividers between items, highlights, visual grouping boundaries and more.

All ItemDecorations are drawn in the order they were added, before the item views (in onDraw()) and after the items (in onDrawOver(Canvas, RecyclerView, RecyclerView.State).

Vertical spacing ItemDecoration

Extend ItemDecoration, add custom constructor which takes space height as a parameter and override getItemOffsets() method:

public class VerticalSpaceItemDecoration extends RecyclerView.ItemDecoration {

    private final int verticalSpaceHeight;

    public VerticalSpaceItemDecoration(int verticalSpaceHeight) {
        this.verticalSpaceHeight = verticalSpaceHeight;
    }

    @Override
    public void getItemOffsets(Rect outRect, View view, RecyclerView parent,
            RecyclerView.State state) {
        outRect.bottom = verticalSpaceHeight;
    }
}

If you don’t want to insert space below the last item, add the following condition:

if (parent.getChildAdapterPosition(view) != parent.getAdapter().getItemCount() - 1) {
            outRect.bottom = verticalSpaceHeight;
}

Note: you can also modify outRect.top, outRect.left and outRect.right properties for desired effect.

Divider ItemDecoration

Extend ItemDecoration and override onDraw() method:

public class DividerItemDecoration extends RecyclerView.ItemDecoration {

    private static final int[] ATTRS = new int[]{android.R.attr.listDivider};

    private Drawable divider;

    /**
     * Default divider will be used
     */
    public DividerItemDecoration(Context context) {
        final TypedArray styledAttributes = context.obtainStyledAttributes(ATTRS);
        divider = styledAttributes.getDrawable(0);
        styledAttributes.recycle();
    }

    /**
     * Custom divider will be used
     */
    public DividerItemDecoration(Context context, int resId) {
        divider = ContextCompat.getDrawable(context, resId);
    }

    @Override
    public void onDraw(Canvas c, RecyclerView parent, RecyclerView.State state) {
        int left = parent.getPaddingLeft();
        int right = parent.getWidth() - parent.getPaddingRight();

        int childCount = parent.getChildCount();
        for (int i = 0; i < childCount; i++) {
            View child = parent.getChildAt(i);

            RecyclerView.LayoutParams params = (RecyclerView.LayoutParams) child.getLayoutParams();

            int top = child.getBottom() + params.bottomMargin;
            int bottom = top + divider.getIntrinsicHeight();

            divider.setBounds(left, top, right, bottom);
            divider.draw(c);
        }
    }
}

You can either call the first constructor that uses the default Android divider attributes, or the second one that uses your own drawable, for example drawable/divider.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
       android:shape="rectangle">
    <size android:height="1dp" />
    <solid android:color="#ff992900" />
</shape>

Note: if you want the divider to be drawn over your items, override onDrawOver() method instead.

Usage

To use your new class add VerticalSpaceItemDecoration or DividerSpaceItemDecoration to RecyclerView, for example in your fragment’s onCreateView() method:

private static final int VERTICAL_ITEM_SPACE = 48;
private RecyclerView recyclerView;
private LinearLayoutManager linearLayoutManager;
@Override
public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container,
        Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    View rootView = inflater.inflate(R.layout.fragment_feed, container, false);

    recyclerView = (RecyclerView) rootView.findViewById(R.id.fragment_home_recycler_view);
    linearLayoutManager = new LinearLayoutManager(getActivity());
    recyclerView.setLayoutManager(linearLayoutManager);
    
    //add ItemDecoration
    recyclerView.addItemDecoration(new VerticalSpaceItemDecoration(VERTICAL_ITEM_SPACE));
    //or
    recyclerView.addItemDecoration(new DividerItemDecoration(getActivity()));
    //or
    recyclerView.addItemDecoration(
            new DividerItemDecoration(getActivity(), R.drawable.divider));

    recyclerView.setAdapter(...);

    return rootView;
}

There’s also Lucas Rocha’s library which is supposed to simplify the item decoration process. Haven’t tried it though.

Among its features are:

  • A collection of stock item decorations including:
  • Item spacing Horizontal/vertical dividers.
  • List item

#44 Best answer 2 of How to add dividers and spaces between items in RecyclerView?(Score: 523)

Created: 2016-12-17 Last updated: 2021-01-30

Just add

recyclerView.addItemDecoration(new DividerItemDecoration(getContext(),
                DividerItemDecoration.VERTICAL));

Also you may need to add the dependency
implementation 'com.android.support:recyclerview-v7:28.0.0'

For customizing it a little bit you can add a custom drawable:

DividerItemDecoration itemDecorator = new DividerItemDecoration(getContext(), DividerItemDecoration.VERTICAL);
itemDecorator.setDrawable(ContextCompat.getDrawable(getContext(), R.drawable.divider));

You are free to use any custom drawable, for instance:

<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
       android:shape="rectangle">
    <solid android:color="@color/colorPrimary"/>
    <size android:height="0.5dp"/>
</shape>

See also original question in stackoverflow

#45: Static way to get 'Context' in Android? (Score: 1021)

Created: 2010-01-04 Last updated: 2018-03-14

Tags: android, android-context

Is there a way to get the current Context instance inside a static method?

I’m looking for that way because I hate saving the ‘Context’ instance each time it changes.

#45 Best answer 1 of Static way to get 'Context' in Android? (Score: 1343)

Created: 2011-02-25 Last updated: 2015-11-15

Do this:

In the Android Manifest file, declare the following.

<application android:name="com.xyz.MyApplication">

</application>

Then write the class:

public class MyApplication extends Application {

    private static Context context;

    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        MyApplication.context = getApplicationContext();
    }

    public static Context getAppContext() {
        return MyApplication.context;
    }
}

Now everywhere call MyApplication.getAppContext() to get your application context statically.

#45 Best answer 2 of Static way to get 'Context' in Android?(Score: 100)

Created: 2015-01-19 Last updated: 2015-06-29

The majority of apps that want a convenient method to get the application context create their own class which extends android.app.Application.

GUIDE

You can accomplish this by first creating a class in your project like the following:

import android.app.Application;
import android.content.Context;

public class App extends Application {

    private static Application sApplication;

    public static Application getApplication() {
        return sApplication;
    }

    public static Context getContext() {
        return getApplication().getApplicationContext();
    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        sApplication = this;
    }
}

Then, in your AndroidManifest you should specify the name of your class in the AndroidManifest.xml’s tag:

<application 
    ...
    android:name="com.example.App" >
    ...
</application>

You can then retrieve the application context in any static method using the following:

public static void someMethod() {
    Context context = App.getContext();
}

WARNING

Before adding something like the above to your project you should consider what the documentation says:

There is normally no need to subclass Application. In most situation, static singletons can provide the same functionality in a more modular way. If your singleton needs a global context (for example to register broadcast receivers), the function to retrieve it can be given a Context which internally uses Context.getApplicationContext() when first constructing the singleton.


REFLECTION

There is also another way to get the application context using reflection. Reflection is often looked down upon in Android and I personally think this should not be used in production.

To retrieve the application context we must invoke a method on a hidden class (ActivityThread) which has been available since API 1:

public static Application getApplicationUsingReflection() throws Exception {
    return (Application) Class.forName("android.app.ActivityThread")
            .getMethod("currentApplication").invoke(null, (Object[]) null);
}

There is one more hidden class (AppGlobals) which provides a way to get the application context in a static way. It gets the context using ActivityThread so there really is no difference between the following method and the one posted above:

public static Application getApplicationUsingReflection() throws Exception {
    return (Application) Class.forName("android.app.AppGlobals")
            .getMethod("getInitialApplication").invoke(null, (Object[]) null);
} 

Happy coding!

See also original question in stackoverflow

#46: How to convert a Drawable to a Bitmap? (Score: 1005)

Created: 2010-06-14 Last updated: 2013-05-28

Tags: android, bitmap, wallpaper, android-drawable

I would like to set a certain Drawable as the device’s wallpaper, but all wallpaper functions accept Bitmaps only. I cannot use WallpaperManager because I’m pre 2.1.

Also, my drawables are downloaded from the web and do not reside in R.drawable.

#46 Best answer 1 of How to convert a Drawable to a Bitmap? (Score: 1337)

Created: 2010-06-14 Last updated: 2016-02-08

This piece of code helps.

Bitmap icon = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(context.getResources(),
                                           R.drawable.icon_resource);

Here a version where the image gets downloaded.

String name = c.getString(str_url);
URL url_value = new URL(name);
ImageView profile = (ImageView)v.findViewById(R.id.vdo_icon);
if (profile != null) {
    Bitmap mIcon1 =
        BitmapFactory.decodeStream(url_value.openConnection().getInputStream());
    profile.setImageBitmap(mIcon1);
}

#46 Best answer 2 of How to convert a Drawable to a Bitmap?(Score: 783)

Created: 2012-05-15 Last updated: 2015-06-23

public static Bitmap drawableToBitmap (Drawable drawable) {
    Bitmap bitmap = null;

    if (drawable instanceof BitmapDrawable) {
        BitmapDrawable bitmapDrawable = (BitmapDrawable) drawable;
        if(bitmapDrawable.getBitmap() != null) {
            return bitmapDrawable.getBitmap();
        }
    }

    if(drawable.getIntrinsicWidth() <= 0 || drawable.getIntrinsicHeight() <= 0) {
        bitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(1, 1, Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888); // Single color bitmap will be created of 1x1 pixel
    } else {
        bitmap = Bitmap.createBitmap(drawable.getIntrinsicWidth(), drawable.getIntrinsicHeight(), Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888);
    }

    Canvas canvas = new Canvas(bitmap);
    drawable.setBounds(0, 0, canvas.getWidth(), canvas.getHeight());
    drawable.draw(canvas);
    return bitmap;
}

See also original question in stackoverflow

#47: Why doesn't RecyclerView have onItemClickListener()? (Score: 997)

Created: 2014-07-22 Last updated: 2019-12-11

Tags: java, android, android-recyclerview

I was exploring RecyclerView and I was surprised to see that RecyclerView does not have onItemClickListener().

I’ve two question.

Main Question

I want to know why Google removed onItemClickListener()?

Is there a performance issue or something else?

Secondary Question

I solved my problem by writing onClick in my RecyclerView.Adapter:

public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder implements OnClickListener {
    
    public TextView txtViewTitle;
    public ImageView imgViewIcon;
     
    public ViewHolder(View itemLayoutView) {
        super(itemLayoutView);
        txtViewTitle = (TextView) itemLayoutView.findViewById(R.id.item_title);
        imgViewIcon = (ImageView) itemLayoutView.findViewById(R.id.item_icon);
    }

	@Override
	public void onClick(View v) {
		
	}
}

Is this ok / is there any better way?

#47 Best answer 1 of Why doesn't RecyclerView have onItemClickListener()? (Score: 1227)

Created: 2014-07-24 Last updated: 2016-08-03

tl;dr 2016 Use RxJava and a PublishSubject to expose an Observable for the clicks.

public class ReactiveAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<MyAdapter.ViewHolder> {
    String[] mDataset = { "Data", "In", "Adapter" };

    private final PublishSubject<String> onClickSubject = PublishSubject.create();

    @Override 
    public void onBindViewHolder(final ViewHolder holder, int position) {
        final String element = mDataset[position];
        
        holder.itemView.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
               onClickSubject.onNext(element);
            }
        });
    }
    
    public Observable<String> getPositionClicks(){
        return onClickSubject.asObservable();
    }
}

Original Post:

Since the introduction of ListView, onItemClickListener has been problematic. The moment you have a click listener for any of the internal elements the callback would not be triggered but it wasn’t notified or well documented (if at all) so there was a lot of confusion and SO questions about it.

Given that RecyclerView takes it a step further and doesn’t have a concept of a row/column, but rather an arbitrarily laid out amount of children, they have delegated the onClick to each one of them, or to programmer implementation.

Think of Recyclerview not as a ListView 1:1 replacement but rather as a more flexible component for complex use cases. And as you say, your solution is what google expected of you. Now you have an adapter who can delegate onClick to an interface passed on the constructor, which is the correct pattern for both ListView and Recyclerview.

public static class ViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder implements OnClickListener {

    public TextView txtViewTitle;
    public ImageView imgViewIcon;
    public IMyViewHolderClicks mListener;

    public ViewHolder(View itemLayoutView, IMyViewHolderClicks listener) {
        super(itemLayoutView);
        mListener = listener;
        txtViewTitle = (TextView) itemLayoutView.findViewById(R.id.item_title);
        imgViewIcon = (ImageView) itemLayoutView.findViewById(R.id.item_icon);
        imgViewIcon.setOnClickListener(this);
        itemLayoutView.setOnClickListener(this);
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        if (v instanceof ImageView){
           mListener.onTomato((ImageView)v);
        } else {
           mListener.onPotato(v);
        }
    }

    public static interface IMyViewHolderClicks {
        public void onPotato(View caller);
        public void onTomato(ImageView callerImage);
    }

}

and then on your adapter

public class MyAdapter extends RecyclerView.Adapter<MyAdapter.ViewHolder> {

   String[] mDataset = { "Data" };

   @Override
   public MyAdapter.ViewHolder onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int viewType) {
       View v = LayoutInflater.from(parent.getContext()).inflate(R.layout.my_layout, parent, false);

       MyAdapter.ViewHolder vh = new ViewHolder(v, new MyAdapter.ViewHolder.IMyViewHolderClicks() { 
           public void onPotato(View caller) { Log.d("VEGETABLES", "Poh-tah-tos"); };
           public void onTomato(ImageView callerImage) { Log.d("VEGETABLES", "To-m8-tohs"); }
        });
        return vh;
    }

    // Replace the contents of a view (invoked by the layout manager) 
    @Override 
    public void onBindViewHolder(ViewHolder holder, int position) {
        // Get element from your dataset at this position 
        // Replace the contents of the view with that element 
        // Clear the ones that won't be used
        holder.txtViewTitle.setText(mDataset[position]);
    } 
 
    // Return the size of your dataset (invoked by the layout manager) 
    @Override 
    public int getItemCount() { 
        return mDataset.length;
    } 
  ...

Now look into that last piece of code: onCreateViewHolder(ViewGroup parent, int viewType) the signature already suggest different view types. For each one of them you’ll require a different viewholder too, and subsequently each one of them can have a different set of clicks. Or you can just create a generic viewholder that takes any view and one onClickListener and applies accordingly. Or delegate up one level to the orchestrator so several fragments/activities have the same list with different click behaviour. Again, all flexibility is on your side.

It is a really needed component and fairly close to what our internal implementations and improvements to ListView were until now. It’s good that Google finally acknowledges it.

#47 Best answer 2 of Why doesn't RecyclerView have onItemClickListener()?(Score: 118)

Created: 2016-03-10 Last updated: 2020-07-05

Why the RecyclerView has no onItemClickListener

The RecyclerView is a toolbox, in contrast of the old ListView it has less build in features and more flexibility. The onItemClickListener is not the only feature being removed from ListView. But it has lot of listeners and method to extend it to your liking, it’s far more powerful in the right hands ;).

In my opinion the most complex feature removed in RecyclerView is the Fast Scroll. Most of the other features can be easily re-implemented.

If you want to know what other cool features RecyclerView added read this answer to another question.

Memory efficient - drop-in solution for onItemClickListener

This solution has been proposed by Hugo Visser, an Android GDE, right after RecyclerView was released. He made a licence-free class available for you to just drop in your code and use it.

It showcase some of the versatility introduced with RecyclerView by making use of RecyclerView.OnChildAttachStateChangeListener.

Edit 2019: kotlin version by me, java one, from Hugo Visser, kept below

Kotlin / Java

Create a file values/ids.xml and put this in it:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <item name="item_click_support" type="id" />
</resources>

then add the code below to your source

Kotlin

Usage:

recyclerView.onItemClick { recyclerView, position, v ->
    // do it
}

(it also support long item click and see below for another feature I’ve added).

implementation (my adaptation to Hugo Visser Java code):

typealias OnRecyclerViewItemClickListener = (recyclerView: RecyclerView, position: Int, v: View) -> Unit
typealias OnRecyclerViewItemLongClickListener = (recyclerView: RecyclerView, position: Int, v: View) -> Boolean

class ItemClickSupport private constructor(private val recyclerView: RecyclerView) {

    private var onItemClickListener: OnRecyclerViewItemClickListener? = null
    private var onItemLongClickListener: OnRecyclerViewItemLongClickListener? = null

    private val attachListener: RecyclerView.OnChildAttachStateChangeListener = object : RecyclerView.OnChildAttachStateChangeListener {
        override fun onChildViewAttachedToWindow(view: View) {
            // every time a new child view is attached add click listeners to it
            val holder = [email protected](view)
                    .takeIf { it is ItemClickSupportViewHolder } as? ItemClickSupportViewHolder

            if (onItemClickListener != null && holder?.isClickable != false) {
                view.setOnClickListener(onClickListener)
            }
            if (onItemLongClickListener != null && holder?.isLongClickable != false) {
                view.setOnLongClickListener(onLongClickListener)
            }
        }

        override fun onChildViewDetachedFromWindow(view: View) {

        }
    }

    init {
        // the ID must be declared in XML, used to avoid
        // replacing the ItemClickSupport without removing
        // the old one from the RecyclerView
        this.recyclerView.setTag(R.id.item_click_support, this)
        this.recyclerView.addOnChildAttachStateChangeListener(attachListener)
    }

    companion object {
        fun addTo(view: RecyclerView): ItemClickSupport {
            // if there's already an ItemClickSupport attached
            // to this RecyclerView do not replace it, use it
            var support: ItemClickSupport? = view.getTag(R.id.item_click_support) as? ItemClickSupport
            if (support == null) {
                support = ItemClickSupport(view)
            }
            return support
        }

        fun removeFrom(view: RecyclerView): ItemClickSupport? {
            val support = view.getTag(R.id.item_click_support) as? ItemClickSupport
            support?.detach(view)
            return support
        }
    }

    private val onClickListener = View.OnClickListener { v ->
        val listener = onItemClickListener ?: [email protected]
        // ask the RecyclerView for the viewHolder of this view.
        // then use it to get the position for the adapter
        val holder = this.recyclerView.getChildViewHolder(v)
        listener.invoke(this.recyclerView, holder.adapterPosition, v)
    }

    private val onLongClickListener = View.OnLongClickListener { v ->
        val listener = onItemLongClickListener ?: [email protected] false
        val holder = this.recyclerView.getChildViewHolder(v)
        [email protected] listener.invoke(this.recyclerView, holder.adapterPosition, v)
    }

    private fun detach(view: RecyclerView) {
        view.removeOnChildAttachStateChangeListener(attachListener)
        view.setTag(R.id.item_click_support, null)
    }

    fun onItemClick(listener: OnRecyclerViewItemClickListener?): ItemClickSupport {
        onItemClickListener = listener
        return this
    }

    fun onItemLongClick(listener: OnRecyclerViewItemLongClickListener?): ItemClickSupport {
        onItemLongClickListener = listener
        return this
    }

}

/** Give click-ability and long-click-ability control to the ViewHolder */
interface ItemClickSupportViewHolder {
    val isClickable: Boolean get() = true
    val isLongClickable: Boolean get() = true
}

// Extension function
fun RecyclerView.addItemClickSupport(configuration: ItemClickSupport.() -> Unit = {}) = ItemClickSupport.addTo(this).apply(configuration)

fun RecyclerView.removeItemClickSupport() = ItemClickSupport.removeFrom(this)

fun RecyclerView.onItemClick(onClick: OnRecyclerViewItemClickListener) {
    addItemClickSupport { onItemClick(onClick) }
}
fun RecyclerView.onItemLongClick(onLongClick: OnRecyclerViewItemLongClickListener) {
    addItemClickSupport { onItemLongClick(onLongClick) }
}

(Remember you also need to add an XML file, see above this section)

Bonus feature of Kotlin version

Sometimes you do not want all the items of the RecyclerView to be clickable.

To handle this I’ve introduced the ItemClickSupportViewHolder interface that you can use on your ViewHolder to control which item is clickable.

Example:

class MyViewHolder(view): RecyclerView.ViewHolder(view), ItemClickSupportViewHolder {
    override val isClickable: Boolean get() = false
    override val isLongClickable: Boolean get() = false
}

Java

Usage:

ItemClickSupport.addTo(mRecyclerView)
        .setOnItemClickListener(new ItemClickSupport.OnItemClickListener() {
    @Override
    public void onItemClicked(RecyclerView recyclerView, int position, View v) {
        // do it
    }
});

(it also support long item click)

Implementation (comments added by me):

public class ItemClickSupport {
    private final RecyclerView mRecyclerView;
    private OnItemClickListener mOnItemClickListener;
    private OnItemLongClickListener mOnItemLongClickListener;
    private View.OnClickListener mOnClickListener = new View.OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            if (mOnItemClickListener != null) {
                // ask the RecyclerView for the viewHolder of this view.
                // then use it to get the position for the adapter
                RecyclerView.ViewHolder holder = mRecyclerView.getChildViewHolder(v);
                mOnItemClickListener.onItemClicked(mRecyclerView, holder.getAdapterPosition(), v);
            }
        }
    };
    private View.OnLongClickListener mOnLongClickListener = new View.OnLongClickListener() {
        @Override
        public boolean onLongClick(View v) {
            if (mOnItemLongClickListener != null) {
                RecyclerView.ViewHolder holder = mRecyclerView.getChildViewHolder(v);
                return mOnItemLongClickListener.onItemLongClicked(mRecyclerView, holder.getAdapterPosition(), v);
            }
            return false;
        }
    };
    private RecyclerView.OnChildAttachStateChangeListener mAttachListener
            = new RecyclerView.OnChildAttachStateChangeListener() {
        @Override
        public void onChildViewAttachedToWindow(View view) {
            // every time a new child view is attached add click listeners to it
            if (mOnItemClickListener != null) {
                view.setOnClickListener(mOnClickListener);
            }
            if (mOnItemLongClickListener != null) {
                view.setOnLongClickListener(mOnLongClickListener);
            }
        }

        @Override
        public void onChildViewDetachedFromWindow(View view) {

        }
    };

    private ItemClickSupport(RecyclerView recyclerView) {
        mRecyclerView = recyclerView;
        // the ID must be declared in XML, used to avoid
        // replacing the ItemClickSupport without removing
        // the old one from the RecyclerView
        mRecyclerView.setTag(R.id.item_click_support, this);
        mRecyclerView.addOnChildAttachStateChangeListener(mAttachListener);
    }

    public static ItemClickSupport addTo(RecyclerView view) {
        // if there's already an ItemClickSupport attached
        // to this RecyclerView do not replace it, use it
        ItemClickSupport support = (ItemClickSupport) view.getTag(R.id.item_click_support);
        if (support == null) {
            support = new ItemClickSupport(view);
        }
        return support;
    }

    public static ItemClickSupport removeFrom(RecyclerView view) {
        ItemClickSupport support = (ItemClickSupport) view.getTag(R.id.item_click_support);
        if (support != null) {
            support.detach(view);
        }
        return support;
    }

    public ItemClickSupport setOnItemClickListener(OnItemClickListener listener) {
        mOnItemClickListener = listener;
        return this;
    }

    public ItemClickSupport setOnItemLongClickListener(OnItemLongClickListener listener) {
        mOnItemLongClickListener = listener;
        return this;
    }

    private void detach(RecyclerView view) {
        view.removeOnChildAttachStateChangeListener(mAttachListener);
        view.setTag(R.id.item_click_support, null);
    }

    public interface OnItemClickListener {

        void onItemClicked(RecyclerView recyclerView, int position, View v);
    }

    public interface OnItemLongClickListener {

        boolean onItemLongClicked(RecyclerView recyclerView, int position, View v);
    }
}

How it works (why it’s efficient)

This class works by attaching a RecyclerView.OnChildAttachStateChangeListener to the RecyclerView. This listener is notified every time a child is attached or detached from the RecyclerView. The code use this to append a tap/long click listener to the view. That listener ask the RecyclerView for the RecyclerView.ViewHolder which contains the position.

This is more efficient then other solutions because it avoid creating multiple listeners for each view and keep destroying and creating them while the RecyclerView is being scrolled.

You could also adapt the code to give you back the holder itself if you need more.

Final remark

Keep in mind that it’s COMPLETELY fine to handle it in your adapter by setting on each view of your list a click listener, like other answer proposed.

It’s just not the most efficient thing to do (you create a new listener every time you reuse a view) but it works and in most cases it’s not an issue.

It is also a bit against separation of concerns cause it’s not really the Job of the Adapter to delegate click events.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#48: Can't start Eclipse - Java was started but returned exit code=13 (Score: 990)

Created: 2012-07-12 Last updated: 2019-01-02

Tags: java, android, windows, eclipse, 32bit-64bit

I am trying to get my first taste of Android development using Eclipse. I ran into this problem when trying to run Eclipse, having installed version 4.2 only minutes ago.

After first trying to start Eclipse without any parameters to specify the Java VM, I got an error message saying it couldn't find a Java VM called javaw.exe inside the Eclipse folder, so I found where Java was installed and specified that location as the parameter in the shortcut’s target. Now I get a different error, Java was started but returned exit code=13.

Similar questions seem to indicate that it’s a 32-bit/64-bit conflict, but I’m 99% positive that I downloaded 64-bit versions of both Eclipse and Java (RE 7u5), which I chose because I have 64-bit Windows 7.

  • If anyone knows how to confirm that my Eclipse and Java are 64-bit, that’d be appreciated.
  • If you think my problem is a different one, please help!
  • Please speak as plainly as you can, as I am totally new to Eclipse and Java.

Shortcut Target: “C:\Program Files\Eclipse-SDK-4.2-win32-x86_64\eclipse\eclipse.exe” -vm “C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre7\bin\javaw.exe”

Full error code…:

Java was started but returned exit code=13
C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre7\bin\javaw.exe
-Xms40m
-Xmx512m
-XX:MaxPermSize=256m
-jar C:\Program Files\Eclipse-SDK-4.2-win32-x86_64\eclipse\\plugins/org.eclipse.equinox.launcher_1.30v20120522-1813.jar
-os win32
-ws win32
-arch x86_64
-showsplash C:\Program Files\Eclipse-SDK-4.2-win32-x86_64\eclipse\\plugins\org.eclipse.platform_4.2.0.v201206081400\splash.bmp
-launcher C:\Program Files\Eclipse-SDK-4.2-win32-x86_64\eclipse\eclipse.exe
-name Eclipse
--launcher.library C:\Program Files\Eclipse-SDK-4.2-win32-x86_64\eclipse\\plugins/org.eclipse.equinox.launcher.win32.win32.x86_64_1.1.200.v201205221813\eclipse_1503.dll
-startup C:\Program Files\Eclipse-SDK-4.2-win32-x86_64\eclipse\\plugins/org.eclipse.equinox.launcher_1.30v20120522-1813.jar
--launcher.overrideVmargs
-exitdata 1e30_5c
-vm C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre7\bin\javaw.exe
-vmargs
-Xms40m
-Xmx512m
-XX:MaxPermSize=256m
-jar C:\Program Files\Eclipse-SDK-4.2-win32-x86_64\eclipse\\plugins/org.eclipse.equinox.launcher_1.30v20120522-1813.jar

#48 Best answer 1 of Can't start Eclipse - Java was started but returned exit code=13 (Score: 754)

Created: 2012-07-12 Last updated: 2019-12-04

Your version of Eclipse is 64-bit, based on the paths and filenames. However, the version of Java that it’s picking up is 32-bit, as indicated by where it is coming from, on this line:

-vm C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre7\bin\javaw.exe

Program Files (x86) is the folder where 64-bit Windows places 32-bit programs.

Program Files is the folder where 64-bit Windows places 64-bit programs.

This can happen when a system has more than one JVM installed, as is often the case on Windows 64-bit (for example, the JRE download page uses the bit-ness of the browser to determine what bit-ness download to offer you, and many people use(d) 32-bit browsers even though they run 64-bit Windows).

The best way to fix this, assuming you do in fact have 64-bit JRE or JDK on your system, is to specify in eclipse.ini exactly which JVM you want it to use. The instructions are detailed in the Eclipse wiki page, but basically you have to specify the -vm option in the ini file - make sure to read the wiki page carefully as the format is very specific.

Specifying the JVM path in eclipse.ini is strongly recommended because doing so isolates Eclipse from any potential changes to your system PATH that some program installers might make (I’m talking to you, Oracle!).

Another option would be to download and use 32-bit Eclipse instead of 64-bit, but it’s still strongly recommended to specify the path to the JVM in eclipse.ini.


Left for historical reference:

To check your version of Java, run

  java -version 

in a console (command prompt). On Windows 7 with 64-bit Java 6 I get:

  java version "1.6.0_27"
  Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_27-b07)
  Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.2-b06, mixed mode)

Note the 3rd line, which shows that this is a 64-bit version.

On a 32-bit version you’ll get something like:

  Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build 20.1-b02, mixed mode, sharing) 

If you are on a 64-bit machine, then you can install the 64-bit JDK and uninstall the 32-bit one. For instance on Windows 10, just go to Settings and under Apps, you will find Java. Click on it and you will find all the different versions. Now you can select which one to uninstall.

#48 Best answer 2 of Can't start Eclipse - Java was started but returned exit code=13(Score: 252)

Created: 2014-11-03 Last updated: 2018-09-12

I got this error and found that my PATH variable (on Windows) was probably changed. First in my PATH was this entry:

C:\ProgramData\Oracle\Java\javapath

…and Eclipse ran "C:\ProgramData\Oracle\Java\javapath\javaw" - which gave the error. I suspect that this is something that came along with an installation of Java 8.

I have several Java versions installed (6,7 and 8), so I removed that entry from the PATH and tried to restart Eclipse again, which worked fine.

If it’s doesn’t work for you, you’ll need to upgrade your JDK (to the Java versions - 8 in this case).

Instructions on how to edit PATH variable

See also original question in stackoverflow

#49: How to check if a service is running on Android? (Score: 985)

Created: 2009-03-01 Last updated: 2019-05-10

Tags: android, android-service

How do I check if a background service is running?

I want an Android activity that toggles the state of the service – it lets me turn it on if it is off and off if it is on.

#49 Best answer 1 of How to check if a service is running on Android? (Score: 1728)

Created: 2011-05-07 Last updated: 2014-11-05

I use the following from inside an activity:

private boolean isMyServiceRunning(Class<?> serviceClass) {
    ActivityManager manager = (ActivityManager) getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
    for (RunningServiceInfo service : manager.getRunningServices(Integer.MAX_VALUE)) {
        if (serviceClass.getName().equals(service.service.getClassName())) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

And I call it using:

isMyServiceRunning(MyService.class)

This works reliably, because it is based on the information about running services provided by the Android operating system through ActivityManager#getRunningServices.

All the approaches using onDestroy or onSometing events or Binders or static variables will not work reliably because as a developer you never know, when Android decides to kill your process or which of the mentioned callbacks are called or not. Please note the “killable” column in the lifecycle events table in the Android documentation.

#49 Best answer 2 of How to check if a service is running on Android?(Score: 303)

Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2015-08-17

I had the same problem not long ago. Since my service was local, I ended up simply using a static field in the service class to toggle state, as described by hackbod here

EDIT (for the record):

Here is the solution proposed by hackbod:

If your client and server code is part of the same .apk and you are binding to the service with a concrete Intent (one that specifies the exact service class), then you can simply have your service set a global variable when it is running that your client can check.

We deliberately don’t have an API to check whether a service is running because, nearly without fail, when you want to do something like that you end up with race conditions in your code.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#50: Ship an application with a database (Score: 981)

Created: 2009-02-04 Last updated: 2016-10-15

Tags: android, android-sqlite, android-database

If your application requires a database and it comes with built in data, what is the best way to ship that application? Should I:

  1. Precreate the SQLite database and include it in the .apk?

  2. Include the SQL commands with the application and have it create the database and insert the data on first use?

The drawbacks I see are:

  1. Possible SQLite version mismatches might cause problems and I currently don’t know where the database should go and how to access it.

  2. It may take a really long time to create and populate the database on the device.

Any suggestions? Pointers to the documentation regarding any issues would be greatly appreciated.

#50 Best answer 1 of Ship an application with a database (Score: 209)

Created: 2011-01-26 Last updated: 2011-02-02

There are two options for creating and updating databases.

One is to create a database externally, then place it in the assets folder of the project and then copy the entire database from there. This is much quicker if the database has a lot of tables and other components. Upgrades are triggered by changing the database version number in the res/values/strings.xml file. Upgrades would then be accomplished by creating a new database externally, replacing the old database in the assets folder with the new database, saving the old database in internal storage under another name, copying the new database from the assets folder into internal storage, transferring all of the data from the old database (that was renamed earlier) into the new database and finally deleting the old database. You can create a database originally by using the SQLite Manager FireFox plugin to execute your creation sql statements.

The other option is to create a database internally from a sql file. This is not as quick but the delay would probably be unnoticeable to the users if the database has only a few tables. Upgrades are triggered by changing the database version number in the res/values/strings.xml file. Upgrades would then be accomplished by processing an upgrade sql file. The data in the database will remain unchanged except when its container is removed, for example dropping a table.

The example below demonstrates how to use either method.

Here is a sample create_database.sql file. It is to be placed in the assets folder of the project for the internal method or copied into the “Execute SQL' of SQLite Manager to create the database for the external method. (NOTE: Notice the comment about the table required by Android.)

--Android requires a table named 'android_metadata' with a 'locale' column
CREATE TABLE "android_metadata" ("locale" TEXT DEFAULT 'en_US');
INSERT INTO "android_metadata" VALUES ('en_US');

CREATE TABLE "kitchen_table";
CREATE TABLE "coffee_table";
CREATE TABLE "pool_table";
CREATE TABLE "dining_room_table";
CREATE TABLE "card_table"; 

Here is a sample update_database.sql file. It is to be placed in the assets folder of the project for the internal method or copied into the “Execute SQL' of SQLite Manager to create the database for the external method. (NOTE: Notice that all three types of SQL comments will be ignored by the sql parser that is included in this example.)

--CREATE TABLE "kitchen_table";  This is one type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql.
/*
 * CREATE TABLE "coffee_table"; This is a second type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql.
 */
{
CREATE TABLE "pool_table";  This is a third type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql.
}
/* CREATE TABLE "dining_room_table"; This is a second type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql. */
{ CREATE TABLE "card_table"; This is a third type of comment in sql.  It is ignored by parseSql. }

--DROP TABLE "picnic_table"; Uncomment this if picnic table was previously created and now is being replaced.
CREATE TABLE "picnic_table" ("plates" TEXT);
INSERT INTO "picnic_table" VALUES ('paper');

Here is an entry to add to the /res/values/strings.xml file for the database version number.

<item type="string" name="databaseVersion" format="integer">1</item>

Here is an activity that accesses the database and then uses it. (Note: You might want to run the database code in a separate thread if it uses a lot of resources.)

package android.example;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;
import android.os.Bundle;

/**
 * @author Danny Remington - MacroSolve
 * 
 *         Activity for demonstrating how to use a sqlite database.
 */
public class Database extends Activity {
     /** Called when the activity is first created. */
     @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);
        DatabaseHelper myDbHelper;
        SQLiteDatabase myDb = null;

        myDbHelper = new DatabaseHelper(this);
        /*
         * Database must be initialized before it can be used. This will ensure
         * that the database exists and is the current version.
         */
         myDbHelper.initializeDataBase();

         try {
            // A reference to the database can be obtained after initialization.
            myDb = myDbHelper.getWritableDatabase();
            /*
             * Place code to use database here.
             */
         } catch (Exception ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
         } finally {
            try {
                myDbHelper.close();
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            } finally {
                myDb.close();
            }
        }

    }
}

Here is the database helper class where the database is created or updated if necessary. (NOTE: Android requires that you create a class that extends SQLiteOpenHelper in order to work with a Sqlite database.)

package android.example;

import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.OutputStream;

import android.content.Context;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteDatabase;
import android.database.sqlite.SQLiteOpenHelper;

/**
 * @author Danny Remington - MacroSolve
 * 
 *         Helper class for sqlite database.
 */
public class DatabaseHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper {

    /*
     * The Android's default system path of the application database in internal
     * storage. The package of the application is part of the path of the
     * directory.
     */
    private static String DB_DIR = "/data/data/android.example/databases/";
    private static String DB_NAME = "database.sqlite";
    private static String DB_PATH = DB_DIR + DB_NAME;
    private static String OLD_DB_PATH = DB_DIR + "old_" + DB_NAME;

    private final Context myContext;

    private boolean createDatabase = false;
    private boolean upgradeDatabase = false;

    /**
     * Constructor Takes and keeps a reference of the passed context in order to
     * access to the application assets and resources.
     * 
     * @param context
     */
    public DatabaseHelper(Context context) {
        super(context, DB_NAME, null, context.getResources().getInteger(
                R.string.databaseVersion));
        myContext = context;
        // Get the path of the database that is based on the context.
        DB_PATH = myContext.getDatabasePath(DB_NAME).getAbsolutePath();
    }

    /**
     * Upgrade the database in internal storage if it exists but is not current. 
     * Create a new empty database in internal storage if it does not exist.
     */
    public void initializeDataBase() {
        /*
         * Creates or updates the database in internal storage if it is needed
         * before opening the database. In all cases opening the database copies
         * the database in internal storage to the cache.
         */
        getWritableDatabase();

        if (createDatabase) {
            /*
             * If the database is created by the copy method, then the creation
             * code needs to go here. This method consists of copying the new
             * database from assets into internal storage and then caching it.
             */
            try {
                /*
                 * Write over the empty data that was created in internal
                 * storage with the one in assets and then cache it.
                 */
                copyDataBase();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                throw new Error("Error copying database");
            }
        } else if (upgradeDatabase) {
            /*
             * If the database is upgraded by the copy and reload method, then
             * the upgrade code needs to go here. This method consists of
             * renaming the old database in internal storage, create an empty
             * new database in internal storage, copying the database from
             * assets to the new database in internal storage, caching the new
             * database from internal storage, loading the data from the old
             * database into the new database in the cache and then deleting the
             * old database from internal storage.
             */
            try {
                FileHelper.copyFile(DB_PATH, OLD_DB_PATH);
                copyDataBase();
                SQLiteDatabase old_db = SQLiteDatabase.openDatabase(OLD_DB_PATH, null, SQLiteDatabase.OPEN_READWRITE);
                SQLiteDatabase new_db = SQLiteDatabase.openDatabase(DB_PATH,null, SQLiteDatabase.OPEN_READWRITE);
                /*
                 * Add code to load data into the new database from the old
                 * database and then delete the old database from internal
                 * storage after all data has been transferred.
                 */
            } catch (IOException e) {
                throw new Error("Error copying database");
            }
        }

    }

    /**
     * Copies your database from your local assets-folder to the just created
     * empty database in the system folder, from where it can be accessed and
     * handled. This is done by transfering bytestream.
     * */
    private void copyDataBase() throws IOException {
        /*
         * Close SQLiteOpenHelper so it will commit the created empty database
         * to internal storage.
         */
        close();

        /*
         * Open the database in the assets folder as the input stream.
         */
        InputStream myInput = myContext.getAssets().open(DB_NAME);

        /*
         * Open the empty db in interal storage as the output stream.
         */
        OutputStream myOutput = new FileOutputStream(DB_PATH);

        /*
         * Copy over the empty db in internal storage with the database in the
         * assets folder.
         */
        FileHelper.copyFile(myInput, myOutput);

        /*
         * Access the copied database so SQLiteHelper will cache it and mark it
         * as created.
         */
        getWritableDatabase().close();
    }

    /*
     * This is where the creation of tables and the initial population of the
     * tables should happen, if a database is being created from scratch instead
     * of being copied from the application package assets. Copying a database
     * from the application package assets to internal storage inside this
     * method will result in a corrupted database.
     * <P>
     * NOTE: This method is normally only called when a database has not already
     * been created. When the database has been copied, then this method is
     * called the first time a reference to the database is retrieved after the
     * database is copied since the database last cached by SQLiteOpenHelper is
     * different than the database in internal storage.
     */
    @Override
    public void onCreate(SQLiteDatabase db) {
        /*
         * Signal that a new database needs to be copied. The copy process must
         * be performed after the database in the cache has been closed causing
         * it to be committed to internal storage. Otherwise the database in
         * internal storage will not have the same creation timestamp as the one
         * in the cache causing the database in internal storage to be marked as
         * corrupted.
         */
        createDatabase = true;

        /*
         * This will create by reading a sql file and executing the commands in
         * it.
         */
            // try {
            // InputStream is = myContext.getResources().getAssets().open(
            // "create_database.sql");
            //
            // String[] statements = FileHelper.parseSqlFile(is);
            //
            // for (String statement : statements) {
            // db.execSQL(statement);
            // }
            // } catch (Exception ex) {
            // ex.printStackTrace();
            // }
    }

    /**
     * Called only if version number was changed and the database has already
     * been created. Copying a database from the application package assets to
     * the internal data system inside this method will result in a corrupted
     * database in the internal data system.
     */
    @Override
    public void onUpgrade(SQLiteDatabase db, int oldVersion, int newVersion) {
        /*
         * Signal that the database needs to be upgraded for the copy method of
         * creation. The copy process must be performed after the database has
         * been opened or the database will be corrupted.
         */
        upgradeDatabase = true;

        /*
         * Code to update the database via execution of sql statements goes
         * here.
         */

        /*
         * This will upgrade by reading a sql file and executing the commands in
         * it.
         */
        // try {
        // InputStream is = myContext.getResources().getAssets().open(
        // "upgrade_database.sql");
        //
        // String[] statements = FileHelper.parseSqlFile(is);
        //
        // for (String statement : statements) {
        // db.execSQL(statement);
        // }
        // } catch (Exception ex) {
        // ex.printStackTrace();
        // }
    }

    /**
     * Called everytime the database is opened by getReadableDatabase or
     * getWritableDatabase. This is called after onCreate or onUpgrade is
     * called.
     */
    @Override
    public void onOpen(SQLiteDatabase db) {
        super.onOpen(db);
    }

    /*
     * Add your public helper methods to access and get content from the
     * database. You could return cursors by doing
     * "return myDataBase.query(....)" so it'd be easy to you to create adapters
     * for your views.
     */

}

Here’s the FileHelper class that contains methods for byte stream copying files and parsing sql files.

package android.example;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.io.Reader;
import java.nio.channels.FileChannel;

/**
 * @author Danny Remington - MacroSolve
 * 
 *         Helper class for common tasks using files.
 * 
 */
public class FileHelper {
    /**
     * Creates the specified <i><b>toFile</b></i> that is a byte for byte a copy
     * of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. If <i><b>toFile</b></i> already existed, then
     * it will be replaced with a copy of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. The name and
     * path of <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be that of <i><b>toFile</b></i>. Both
     * <i><b>fromFile</b></i> and <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be closed by this
     * operation.
     * 
     * @param fromFile
     *            - InputStream for the file to copy from.
     * @param toFile
     *            - InputStream for the file to copy to.
     */
    public static void copyFile(InputStream fromFile, OutputStream toFile) throws IOException {
        // transfer bytes from the inputfile to the outputfile
        byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
        int length;

        try {
            while ((length = fromFile.read(buffer)) > 0) {
                toFile.write(buffer, 0, length);
            }
        }
        // Close the streams
        finally {
            try {
                if (toFile != null) {
                    try {
                        toFile.flush();
                    } finally {
                        toFile.close();
                    }
            }
            } finally {
                if (fromFile != null) {
                    fromFile.close();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Creates the specified <i><b>toFile</b></i> that is a byte for byte a copy
     * of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. If <i><b>toFile</b></i> already existed, then
     * it will be replaced with a copy of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. The name and
     * path of <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be that of <i><b>toFile</b></i>. Both
     * <i><b>fromFile</b></i> and <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be closed by this
     * operation.
     * 
     * @param fromFile
     *            - String specifying the path of the file to copy from.
     * @param toFile
     *            - String specifying the path of the file to copy to.
     */
    public static void copyFile(String fromFile, String toFile) throws IOException {
        copyFile(new FileInputStream(fromFile), new FileOutputStream(toFile));
    }

    /**
     * Creates the specified <i><b>toFile</b></i> that is a byte for byte a copy
     * of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. If <i><b>toFile</b></i> already existed, then
     * it will be replaced with a copy of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. The name and
     * path of <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be that of <i><b>toFile</b></i>. Both
     * <i><b>fromFile</b></i> and <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be closed by this
     * operation.
     * 
     * @param fromFile
     *            - File for the file to copy from.
     * @param toFile
     *            - File for the file to copy to.
     */
    public static void copyFile(File fromFile, File toFile) throws IOException {
        copyFile(new FileInputStream(fromFile), new FileOutputStream(toFile));
    }

    /**
     * Creates the specified <i><b>toFile</b></i> that is a byte for byte a copy
     * of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. If <i><b>toFile</b></i> already existed, then
     * it will be replaced with a copy of <i><b>fromFile</b></i>. The name and
     * path of <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be that of <i><b>toFile</b></i>. Both
     * <i><b>fromFile</b></i> and <i><b>toFile</b></i> will be closed by this
     * operation.
     * 
     * @param fromFile
     *            - FileInputStream for the file to copy from.
     * @param toFile
     *            - FileInputStream for the file to copy to.
     */
    public static void copyFile(FileInputStream fromFile, FileOutputStream toFile) throws IOException {
        FileChannel fromChannel = fromFile.getChannel();
        FileChannel toChannel = toFile.getChannel();

        try {
            fromChannel.transferTo(0, fromChannel.size(), toChannel);
        } finally {
            try {
                if (fromChannel != null) {
                    fromChannel.close();
                }
            } finally {
                if (toChannel != null) {
                    toChannel.close();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Parses a file containing sql statements into a String array that contains
     * only the sql statements. Comments and white spaces in the file are not
     * parsed into the String array. Note the file must not contained malformed
     * comments and all sql statements must end with a semi-colon ";" in order
     * for the file to be parsed correctly. The sql statements in the String
     * array will not end with a semi-colon ";".
     * 
     * @param sqlFile
     *            - String containing the path for the file that contains sql
     *            statements.
     * 
     * @return String array containing the sql statements.
     */
    public static String[] parseSqlFile(String sqlFile) throws IOException {
        return parseSqlFile(new BufferedReader(new FileReader(sqlFile)));
    }

    /**
     * Parses a file containing sql statements into a String array that contains
     * only the sql statements. Comments and white spaces in the file are not
     * parsed into the String array. Note the file must not contained malformed
     * comments and all sql statements must end with a semi-colon ";" in order
     * for the file to be parsed correctly. The sql statements in the String
     * array will not end with a semi-colon ";".
     * 
     * @param sqlFile
     *            - InputStream for the file that contains sql statements.
     * 
     * @return String array containing the sql statements.
     */
    public static String[] parseSqlFile(InputStream sqlFile) throws IOException {
        return parseSqlFile(new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(sqlFile)));
    }

    /**
     * Parses a file containing sql statements into a String array that contains
     * only the sql statements. Comments and white spaces in the file are not
     * parsed into the String array. Note the file must not contained malformed
     * comments and all sql statements must end with a semi-colon ";" in order
     * for the file to be parsed correctly. The sql statements in the String
     * array will not end with a semi-colon ";".
     * 
     * @param sqlFile
     *            - Reader for the file that contains sql statements.
     * 
     * @return String array containing the sql statements.
     */
    public static String[] parseSqlFile(Reader sqlFile) throws IOException {
        return parseSqlFile(new BufferedReader(sqlFile));
    }

    /**
     * Parses a file containing sql statements into a String array that contains
     * only the sql statements. Comments and white spaces in the file are not
     * parsed into the String array. Note the file must not contained malformed
     * comments and all sql statements must end with a semi-colon ";" in order
     * for the file to be parsed correctly. The sql statements in the String
     * array will not end with a semi-colon ";".
     * 
     * @param sqlFile
     *            - BufferedReader for the file that contains sql statements.
     * 
     * @return String array containing the sql statements.
     */
    public static String[] parseSqlFile(BufferedReader sqlFile) throws IOException {
        String line;
        StringBuilder sql = new StringBuilder();
        String multiLineComment = null;

        while ((line = sqlFile.readLine()) != null) {
            line = line.trim();

            // Check for start of multi-line comment
            if (multiLineComment == null) {
                // Check for first multi-line comment type
                if (line.startsWith("/*")) {
                    if (!line.endsWith("}")) {
                        multiLineComment = "/*";
                    }
                // Check for second multi-line comment type
                } else if (line.startsWith("{")) {
                    if (!line.endsWith("}")) {
                        multiLineComment = "{";
                }
                // Append line if line is not empty or a single line comment
                } else if (!line.startsWith("--") && !line.equals("")) {
                    sql.append(line);
                } // Check for matching end comment
            } else if (multiLineComment.equals("/*")) {
                if (line.endsWith("*/")) {
                    multiLineComment = null;
                }
            // Check for matching end comment
            } else if (multiLineComment.equals("{")) {
                if (line.endsWith("}")) {
                    multiLineComment = null;
                }
            }

        }

        sqlFile.close();

        return sql.toString().split(";");
    }

}

#50 Best answer 2 of Ship an application with a database(Score: 131)

Created: 2012-08-03 Last updated: 2018-10-07

The SQLiteAssetHelper library makes this task really simple.

It’s easy to add as a gradle dependency (but a Jar is also available for Ant/Eclipse), and together with the documentation it can be found at:
https://github.com/jgilfelt/android-sqlite-asset-helper

Note: This project is no longer maintained as stated on above Github link.

As explained in documentation:

  1. Add the dependency to your module’s gradle build file:

     dependencies {
         compile 'com.readystatesoftware.sqliteasset:sqliteassethelper:+'
     }
    
  2. Copy the database into the assets directory, in a subdirectory called assets/databases. For instance:
    assets/databases/my_database.db

(Optionally, you may compress the database in a zip file such as assets/databases/my_database.zip. This isn’t needed, since the APK is compressed as a whole already.) 3. Create a class, for example:

    public class MyDatabase extends SQLiteAssetHelper {
    
        private static final String DATABASE_NAME = "my_database.db";
        private static final int DATABASE_VERSION = 1;
    
        public MyDatabase(Context context) {
            super(context, DATABASE_NAME, null, DATABASE_VERSION);
        }
    }

See also original question in stackoverflow


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