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Most votes on android questions 9

Most votes on android questions 9. #81 Android getResources().getDrawable() deprecated API 22 #82 How to change fontFamily of TextView in Android #83 How to define a circle shape in an Android XML drawable file? #84 What's the best way to limit text length of EditText in Android #85 How to prevent a dialog from closing when a button is clicked #86 How do I put a border around an Android textview? #87 How do you install an APK file in the Android emulator? #88 getColor(int id) deprecated on Android 6.0 Marshmallow (API 23) #89 How do I obtain crash-data from my Android application? #90 Standard Android Button with a different color

Read all the top votes questions and answers in a single page.

#81: Android getResources().getDrawable() deprecated API 22 (Score: 782)

Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2019-03-02

Tags: android, android-drawable, android-resources, android-5.1.1-lollipop

With new android API 22 getResources().getDrawable() is now deprecated. Now the best approach is to use only getDrawable().

What changed?

#81 Best answer 1 of Android getResources().getDrawable() deprecated API 22 (Score: 1164)

Created: 2015-03-19 Last updated: 2017-08-11

You have some options to handle this deprecation the right (and future proof) way, depending on which kind of drawable you are loading:


A) drawables with theme attributes

ContextCompat.getDrawable(getActivity(), R.drawable.name);

You’ll obtain a styled Drawable as your Activity theme instructs. This is probably what you need.


B) drawables without theme attributes

ResourcesCompat.getDrawable(getResources(), R.drawable.name, null);

You’ll get your unstyled drawable the old way. Please note: ResourcesCompat.getDrawable() is not deprecated!


EXTRA) drawables with theme attributes from another theme

ResourcesCompat.getDrawable(getResources(), R.drawable.name, anotherTheme);

#81 Best answer 2 of Android getResources().getDrawable() deprecated API 22(Score: 750)

Created: 2015-03-13 Last updated: 2016-08-06

Edit: see my blog post on the subject for a more complete explanation


You should use the following code from the support library instead:

ContextCompat.getDrawable(context, R.drawable.***)

Using this method is equivalent to calling:

if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= Build.VERSION_CODES.LOLLIPOP) {
    return resources.getDrawable(id, context.getTheme());
} else {
    return resources.getDrawable(id);
}

As of API 21, you should use the getDrawable(int, Theme) method instead of getDrawable(int), as it allows you to fetch a drawable object associated with a particular resource ID for the given screen density/theme. Calling the deprecated getDrawable(int) method is equivalent to calling getDrawable(int, null).

See also original question in stackoverflow

#82: How to change fontFamily of TextView in Android (Score: 774)

Created: 2012-08-26 Last updated: 2016-08-02

Tags: android, android-layout, textview, typeface

So I’d like to change the android:fontFamily in Android but I don’t see any pre-defined fonts in Android. How do I select one of the pre-defined ones? I don’t really need to define my own TypeFace but all I need is something different from what it shows right now.

<TextView
    android:id="@+id/HeaderText"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_alignParentTop="true"
    android:layout_centerHorizontal="true"
    android:layout_marginTop="52dp"
    android:gravity="center"
    android:text="CallerBlocker"
    android:textSize="40dp"
    android:fontFamily="Arial"
 />

It seems what I did up there won’t really work! BTW android:fontFamily="Arial" was a stupid attempt!

#82 Best answer 1 of How to change fontFamily of TextView in Android (Score: 1700)

Created: 2012-11-11 Last updated: 2016-10-18

From android 4.1 / 4.2 / 5.0, the following Roboto font families are available:

android:fontFamily="sans-serif"           // roboto regular
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-light"     // roboto light
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-condensed" // roboto condensed
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-black"     // roboto black
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-thin"      // roboto thin (android 4.2)
android:fontFamily="sans-serif-medium"    // roboto medium (android 5.0)

enter image description here

in combination with

android:textStyle="normal|bold|italic"

this 16 variants are possible:

  • Roboto regular
  • Roboto italic
  • Roboto bold
  • Roboto bold italic
  • Roboto-Light
  • Roboto-Light italic
  • Roboto-Thin
  • Roboto-Thin italic
  • Roboto-Condensed
  • Roboto-Condensed italic
  • Roboto-Condensed bold
  • Roboto-Condensed bold italic
  • Roboto-Black
  • Roboto-Black italic
  • Roboto-Medium
  • Roboto-Medium italic

fonts.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <string name="font_family_light">sans-serif-light</string>
    <string name="font_family_medium">sans-serif-medium</string>
    <string name="font_family_regular">sans-serif</string>
    <string name="font_family_condensed">sans-serif-condensed</string>
    <string name="font_family_black">sans-serif-black</string>
    <string name="font_family_thin">sans-serif-thin</string>
</resources>

#82 Best answer 2 of How to change fontFamily of TextView in Android(Score: 229)

Created: 2012-08-26 Last updated: 2017-05-23

This is the way to set the font programmatically:

TextView tv = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.appname);
Typeface face = Typeface.createFromAsset(getAssets(),
            "fonts/epimodem.ttf");
tv.setTypeface(face);

put the font file in your assets folder. In my case I created a subdirectory called fonts.

EDIT: If you wonder where is your assets folder see this question

See also original question in stackoverflow

#83: How to define a circle shape in an Android XML drawable file? (Score: 767)

Created: 2010-07-06 Last updated: 2020-05-21

Tags: android, android-drawable, shapes

I have some problems finding the documentation of the definitions of shapes in XML for Android. I would like to define a simple circle filled with a solid color in an XML File to include it into my layout files.

Sadly the Documentation on android.com does not cover the XML attributes of the Shape classes. I think I should use an ArcShape to draw a circle but there is no explanation on how to set the size, the color, or the angle needed to make a circle out of an Arc.

#83 Best answer 1 of How to define a circle shape in an Android XML drawable file? (Score: 1667)

Created: 2012-08-25

This is a simple circle as a drawable in Android.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:shape="oval">

   <solid 
       android:color="#666666"/>

   <size 
       android:width="120dp"
        android:height="120dp"/>
</shape>

#83 Best answer 2 of How to define a circle shape in an Android XML drawable file?(Score: 817)

Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-09-14

Set this as your view background

<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:shape="oval">
    <stroke
        android:width="1dp"
        android:color="#78d9ff"/>
</shape>

enter image description here

For solid circle use:

<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:shape="oval">
    <solid
        android:color="#48b3ff"/>
</shape>

enter image description here

Solid with stroke:

<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:shape="oval">
    <solid android:color="#199fff"/>
    <stroke
        android:width="2dp"
        android:color="#444444"/>
</shape>

enter image description here

Note: To make the oval shape appear as a circle, in these examples, either your view that you are using this shape as its background should be a square or you have to set the height and width properties of the shape tag to an equal value.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#84: What's the best way to limit text length of EditText in Android (Score: 763)

Created: 2010-07-19 Last updated: 2019-12-05

Tags: android, android-edittext, maxlength

What’s the best way to limit the text length of an EditText in Android?

Is there a way to do this via xml?

#84 Best answer 1 of What's the best way to limit text length of EditText in Android (Score: 1485)

Created: 2010-07-19 Last updated: 2015-12-15

Documentation

Example

android:maxLength="10"

#84 Best answer 2 of What's the best way to limit text length of EditText in Android(Score: 360)

Created: 2010-11-10 Last updated: 2013-10-28

use an input filter to limit the max length of a text view.

TextView editEntryView = new TextView(...);
InputFilter[] filterArray = new InputFilter[1];
filterArray[0] = new InputFilter.LengthFilter(8);
editEntryView.setFilters(filterArray);

See also original question in stackoverflow

#85: How to prevent a dialog from closing when a button is clicked (Score: 763)

Created: 2010-04-12 Last updated: 2016-11-18

Tags: android, dialog, android-alertdialog, android-dialog, android-dialogfragment

I have a dialog with EditText for input. When I click the “yes” button on dialog, it will validate the input and then close the dialog. However, if the input is wrong, I want to remain in the same dialog. Every time no matter what the input is, the dialog should be automatically closed when I click on the “no” button. How can I disable this? By the way, I have used PositiveButton and NegativeButton for the button on dialog.

#85 Best answer 1 of How to prevent a dialog from closing when a button is clicked (Score: 956)

Created: 2011-10-03 Last updated: 2017-12-04

EDIT: This only works on API 8+ as noted by some of the comments.

This is a late answer, but you can add an onShowListener to the AlertDialog where you can then override the onClickListener of the button.

final AlertDialog dialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(context)
        .setView(v)
        .setTitle(R.string.my_title)
        .setPositiveButton(android.R.string.ok, null) //Set to null. We override the onclick
        .setNegativeButton(android.R.string.cancel, null)
        .create();

dialog.setOnShowListener(new DialogInterface.OnShowListener() {
    
    @Override
    public void onShow(DialogInterface dialogInterface) {
        
        Button button = ((AlertDialog) dialog).getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
        button.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            
            @Override
            public void onClick(View view) {
                // TODO Do something
                
                //Dismiss once everything is OK.
                dialog.dismiss();
            }
        });
    }
});
dialog.show();

#85 Best answer 2 of How to prevent a dialog from closing when a button is clicked(Score: 687)

Created: 2013-03-25 Last updated: 2020-06-20

Here are some solutions for all types of dialogs including a solution for AlertDialog.Builder that will work on all API levels (works below API 8, which the other answer here does not). There are solutions for AlertDialogs using AlertDialog.Builder, DialogFragment, and DialogPreference.

Below are the code examples showing how to override the default common button handler and prevent the dialog from closing for these different forms of dialogs. All the examples show how to prevent the positive button from closing the dialog.

Note: A description of how the dialog closing works under the hood for the base android classes and why the following approaches are chosen follows after the examples, for those who want more details


AlertDialog.Builder - Change default button handler immediately after show()

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
builder.setMessage("Test for preventing dialog close");
builder.setPositiveButton("Test", 
        new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()
        {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which)
            {
                //Do nothing here because we override this button later to change the close behaviour. 
                //However, we still need this because on older versions of Android unless we 
                //pass a handler the button doesn't get instantiated
            }
        });
final AlertDialog dialog = builder.create();
dialog.show();
//Overriding the handler immediately after show is probably a better approach than OnShowListener as described below
dialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener()
      {            
          @Override
          public void onClick(View v)
          {
              Boolean wantToCloseDialog = false;
              //Do stuff, possibly set wantToCloseDialog to true then...
              if(wantToCloseDialog)
                  dialog.dismiss();
              //else dialog stays open. Make sure you have an obvious way to close the dialog especially if you set cancellable to false.
          }
      });

DialogFragment - override onResume()

@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState)
{
    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
    builder.setMessage("Test for preventing dialog close");
    builder.setPositiveButton("Test", 
        new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()
        {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which)
            {
                //Do nothing here because we override this button later to change the close behaviour. 
                //However, we still need this because on older versions of Android unless we 
                //pass a handler the button doesn't get instantiated
            }
        });
    return builder.create();
}

//onStart() is where dialog.show() is actually called on 
//the underlying dialog, so we have to do it there or 
//later in the lifecycle.
//Doing it in onResume() makes sure that even if there is a config change 
//environment that skips onStart then the dialog will still be functioning
//properly after a rotation.
@Override
public void onResume()
{
    super.onResume();    
    final AlertDialog d = (AlertDialog)getDialog();
    if(d != null)
    {
        Button positiveButton = (Button) d.getButton(Dialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
        positiveButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener()
                {
                    @Override
                    public void onClick(View v)
                    {
                        Boolean wantToCloseDialog = false;
                        //Do stuff, possibly set wantToCloseDialog to true then...
                        if(wantToCloseDialog)
                            d.dismiss();
                        //else dialog stays open. Make sure you have an obvious way to close the dialog especially if you set cancellable to false.
                    }
                });
    }
}

DialogPreference - override showDialog()

@Override
protected void onPrepareDialogBuilder(Builder builder)
{
    super.onPrepareDialogBuilder(builder);
    builder.setPositiveButton("Test", this);   //Set the button here so it gets created
}

@Override
protected void showDialog(Bundle state)
{       
    super.showDialog(state);    //Call show on default first so we can override the handlers

    final AlertDialog d = (AlertDialog) getDialog();
    d.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener()
            {            
                @Override
                public void onClick(View v)
                {
                    Boolean wantToCloseDialog = false;
                    //Do stuff, possibly set wantToCloseDialog to true then...
                    if(wantToCloseDialog)
                        d.dismiss();
                    //else dialog stays open. Make sure you have an obvious way to close the dialog especially if you set cancellable to false.
                }
            });
}

Explanation of approaches:

Looking through Android source code the AlertDialog default implementation works by registering a common button handler to all the actual buttons in OnCreate(). When a button is clicked the common button handler forwards the click event to whatever handler you passed in setButton() then calls dismisses the dialog.

If you wish to prevent a dialog box from closing when one of these buttons is pressed you must replace the common button handler for the actual view of the button. Because it is assigned in OnCreate(), you must replace it after the default OnCreate() implementation is called. OnCreate is called in the process of the show() method. You could create a custom Dialog class and override OnCreate() to call the super.OnCreate() then override the button handlers, but if you make a custom dialog you don’t get the Builder for free, in which case what is the point?

So, in using a dialog the way it is designed but with controlling when it is dismissed, one approach is to call dialog.Show() first, then obtain a reference to the button using dialog.getButton() to override the click handler. Another approach is to use setOnShowListener() and implement finding the button view and replacing the handler in the OnShowListener. The functional difference between the two is ‘almost’ nill, depending on what thread originally creates the dialog instance. Looking through the source code, the onShowListener gets called by a message posted to a handler running on the thread that created that dialog. So, since your OnShowListener is called by a message posted on the message queue it is technically possible that calling your listener is delayed some time after show completes.

Therefore, I believe the safest approach is the first: to call show.Dialog(), then immediately in the same execution path replace the button handlers. Since your code that calls show() will be operating on the main GUI thread, it means whatever code you follow show() with will be executed before any other code on that thread, whereas the timing of the OnShowListener method is at the mercy of the message queue.

See also original question in stackoverflow

#86: How do I put a border around an Android textview? (Score: 757)

Created: 2010-08-16 Last updated: 2021-03-24

Tags: android, android-layout, textview, android-shapedrawable

Is it possible to draw a border around a textview?

#86 Best answer 1 of How do I put a border around an Android textview? (Score: 1338)

Created: 2010-08-16 Last updated: 2017-04-03

You can set a shape drawable (a rectangle) as background for the view.

<TextView android:text="Some text" android:background="@drawable/back"/>

And rectangle drawable back.xml (put into res/drawable folder):

<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" android:shape="rectangle" >
   <solid android:color="@android:color/white" />
   <stroke android:width="1dip" android:color="#4fa5d5"/>
</shape>

You can use @android:color/transparent for the solid color to have a transparent background. You can also use padding to separate the text from the border. for more information see: http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/resources/drawable-resource.html

#86 Best answer 2 of How do I put a border around an Android textview?(Score: 210)

Created: 2015-04-04 Last updated: 2017-05-23

Let me summarize a few different (non-programmatic) methods.

Using a shape drawable

Save the following as an XML file in your drawable folder (for example, my_border.xml):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:shape="rectangle" >

    <!-- View background color -->
    <solid
        android:color="@color/background_color" >
    </solid>

    <!-- View border color and width -->
    <stroke
        android:width="1dp"
        android:color="@color/border_color" >
    </stroke>

    <!-- The radius makes the corners rounded -->
    <corners
        android:radius="2dp"   >
    </corners>

</shape>

Then just set it as the background to your TextView:

<TextView
    android:id="@+id/textview1"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:background="@drawable/my_border" />

More help:

Using a 9-patch

A 9-patch is a stretchable background image. If you make an image with a border then it will give your TextView a border. All you need to do is make the image and then set it to the background in your TextView.

<TextView
    android:id="@+id/textview1"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:background="@drawable/my_ninepatch_image" />

Here are some links that will show how to make a 9-patch image:

What if I just want the top border?

Using a layer-list

You can use a layer list to stack two rectangles on top of each other. By making the second rectangle just a little smaller than the first rectangle, you can make a border effect. The first (lower) rectangle is the border color and the second rectangle is the background color.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<layer-list xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

    <!-- Lower rectangle (border color) -->
    <item>
        <shape android:shape="rectangle">
            <solid android:color="@color/border_color" />
        </shape>
    </item>

    <!-- Upper rectangle (background color) -->
    <item android:top="2dp">
        <shape android:shape="rectangle">
            <solid android:color="@color/background_color" />
        </shape>
    </item>
</layer-list>

Setting android:top="2dp" offsets the top (makes it smaller) by 2dp. This allows the first (lower) rectangle to show through, giving a border effect. You can apply this to the TextView background the same way that the shape drawable was done above.

Here are some more links about layer lists:

Using a 9-patch

You can just make a 9-patch image with a single border. Everything else is the same as discussed above.

Using a View

This is kind of a trick but it works well if you need to add a seperator between two views or a border to a single TextView.

<LinearLayout
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical" >

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textview1"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

    <!-- This adds a border between the TextViews -->
    <View
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="2dp"
        android:background="@android:color/black" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/textview2"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

</LinearLayout>

Here are some more links:

See also original question in stackoverflow

#87: How do you install an APK file in the Android emulator? (Score: 756)

Created: 2010-08-13 Last updated: 2014-01-18

Tags: android, android-emulator, installation, apk

I finally managed to obfuscate my Android application, now I want to test it by installing the APK file and running it on the emulator.

How can I install an APK file on the Android Emulator?

#87 Best answer 1 of How do you install an APK file in the Android emulator? (Score: 1046)

Created: 2010-08-13 Last updated: 2020-12-10

You can simply drag and drop the .apk file of your application to the emulator and it will automatically start installing.

Another option:


Windows:

  1. Execute the emulator (SDK Manager.exe->Tools->Manage AVDs…->New then Start)
  2. Start the console (Windows XP), Run -> type cmd, and move to the platform-tools folder of SDK directory.
  3. Paste the APK file in the ‘android-sdk\tools’ or ‘platform-tools’ folder.
  4. Then type the following command.

adb install [.apk path]

Example:

adb install C:\Users\Name\MyProject\build\Jorgesys.apk

Linux:

  1. Copy the apk file to platform-tools in the android-sdk linux folder.
  2. Open Terminal and navigate to platform-tools folder in android-sdk.
  3. Then Execute this command -

./adb install FileName.apk

  1. If the operation is successful (the result is displayed on the screen), then you will find your file in the launcher of your emulator.

Mac:

PATH=$PATH:~/Library/Android/sdk/platform-tools

Example : PATH=$PATH:/users/jorgesys/eclipse/android-sdk-mac_64/tools

Then run adb.

Mac:

1.Run the emulator,

2.then copy your .apk file and paste into /Users/your_system_username/Library/Android/sdk/platform-tools,
if you are not able to find sdk path in your mac system, do the following steps: Open finder->select Go option on top menu -> select Go to Folder option -> it will popup a window with a textfield: /Users/your_system_username/Library/Android/sdk/ -> now open platform-tools folder and paste your copied .apk file,

  1. Now open the terminal and type the following: cd Library/Android/sdk/platform-tools

  2. execute the following in your terminal: ./adb install yourapkfilename.apk if you get the following error message: error: no devices found - waiting for device, follow step 5.

  3. Run your emulator from Android Studio, once emulator active then repeat step 4, you will see the success message on your terminal.

#87 Best answer 2 of How do you install an APK file in the Android emulator?(Score: 124)

Created: 2011-12-23

If you’ve created more than one emulators or if you have an Android device plugged in, adb will complain with

error: more than one device and emulator

adb help is not extremely clear on what to do:

-d                        - directs command to the only connected USB device...
-e                        - directs command to the only running emulator...
-s <serial number>        ...
-p <product name or path> ...

The flag you decide to use has to come before the actual adb command:

adb -e install path/to/app.apk

See also original question in stackoverflow

#88: getColor(int id) deprecated on Android 6.0 Marshmallow (API 23) (Score: 749)

Created: 2015-07-23 Last updated: 2018-02-10

Tags: android, android-resources, android-6.0-marshmallow, android-mnc

The Resources.getColor(int id) method has been deprecated.

@ColorInt
@Deprecated
public int getColor(@ColorRes int id) throws NotFoundException {
    return getColor(id, null);
}

What should I do?

#88 Best answer 1 of getColor(int id) deprecated on Android 6.0 Marshmallow (API 23) (Score: 1410)

Created: 2015-07-23 Last updated: 2020-06-20

Starting from Android Support Library 23,
a new getColor() method has been added to ContextCompat.

Its description from the official JavaDoc:

Returns a color associated with a particular resource ID

Starting in M, the returned color will be styled for the specified Context’s theme.


So, just call:

ContextCompat.getColor(context, R.color.your_color);

You can check the ContextCompat.getColor() source code on GitHub.

#88 Best answer 2 of getColor(int id) deprecated on Android 6.0 Marshmallow (API 23)(Score: 515)

Created: 2015-08-21 Last updated: 2020-03-12

tl;dr:

ContextCompat.getColor(context, R.color.my_color)

Explanation:

You will need to use ContextCompat.getColor(), which is part of the Support V4 Library (it will work for all the previous APIs).

ContextCompat.getColor(context, R.color.my_color)

If you don’t already use the Support Library, you will need to add the following line to the dependencies array inside your app build.gradle (note: it’s optional if you already use the appcompat (V7) library):

compile 'com.android.support:support-v4:23.0.0' # or any version above

If you care about themes, the documentation specifies that:

Starting in M, the returned color will be styled for the specified Context’s theme

See also original question in stackoverflow

#89: How do I obtain crash-data from my Android application? (Score: 746)

Created: 2009-03-02 Last updated: 2010-10-01

Tags: android, crash, stack-trace

How can I get crash data (stack traces at least) from my Android application? At least when working on my own device being retrieved by cable, but ideally from any instance of my application running on the wild so that I can improve it and make it more solid.

#89 Best answer 1 of How do I obtain crash-data from my Android application? (Score: 355)

Created: 2010-05-18 Last updated: 2017-03-02

You might try the ACRA (Application Crash Report for Android) library:

ACRA is a library enabling Android Application to automatically post their crash reports to a GoogleDoc form. It is targetted to android applications developers to help them get data from their applications when they crash or behave erroneously.

It’s easy to install in your app, highly configurable and don’t require you to host a server script anywhere… reports are sent to a Google Doc spreadsheet !

#89 Best answer 2 of How do I obtain crash-data from my Android application?(Score: 307)

Created: 2009-04-16 Last updated: 2018-03-15

For sample applications and debugging purposes, I use a simple solution that allows me to write the stacktrace to the sd card of the device and/or upload it to a server. This solution has been inspired by Project android-remote-stacktrace (specifically, the save-to-device and upload-to-server parts) and I think it solves the problem mentioned by Soonil. It’s not optimal, but it works and you can improve it if you want to use it in a production application. If you decide to upload the stacktraces to the server, you can use a php script (index.php) to view them. If you’re interested, you can find all the sources below - one java class for your application and two optional php scrips for the server hosting the uploaded stacktraces.

In a Context (e.g. the main Activity), call

if(!(Thread.getDefaultUncaughtExceptionHandler() instanceof CustomExceptionHandler)) {
    Thread.setDefaultUncaughtExceptionHandler(new CustomExceptionHandler(
            "/sdcard/<desired_local_path>", "http://<desired_url>/upload.php"));
}

CustomExceptionHandler

public class CustomExceptionHandler implements UncaughtExceptionHandler {

    private UncaughtExceptionHandler defaultUEH;

    private String localPath;

    private String url;

    /* 
     * if any of the parameters is null, the respective functionality 
     * will not be used 
     */
    public CustomExceptionHandler(String localPath, String url) {
        this.localPath = localPath;
        this.url = url;
        this.defaultUEH = Thread.getDefaultUncaughtExceptionHandler();
    }

    public void uncaughtException(Thread t, Throwable e) {
        String timestamp = TimestampFormatter.getInstance().getTimestamp();
        final Writer result = new StringWriter();
        final PrintWriter printWriter = new PrintWriter(result);
        e.printStackTrace(printWriter);
        String stacktrace = result.toString();
        printWriter.close();
        String filename = timestamp + ".stacktrace";
    
        if (localPath != null) {
            writeToFile(stacktrace, filename);
        }
        if (url != null) {
            sendToServer(stacktrace, filename);
        }
    
        defaultUEH.uncaughtException(t, e);
    }

    private void writeToFile(String stacktrace, String filename) {
        try {
            BufferedWriter bos = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(
                    localPath + "/" + filename));
            bos.write(stacktrace);
            bos.flush();
            bos.close();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    private void sendToServer(String stacktrace, String filename) {
        DefaultHttpClient httpClient = new DefaultHttpClient();
        HttpPost httpPost = new HttpPost(url);
        List<NameValuePair> nvps = new ArrayList<NameValuePair>();
        nvps.add(new BasicNameValuePair("filename", filename));
        nvps.add(new BasicNameValuePair("stacktrace", stacktrace));
        try {
            httpPost.setEntity(
                    new UrlEncodedFormEntity(nvps, HTTP.UTF_8));
            httpClient.execute(httpPost);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

upload.php

<?php
    $filename = isset($_POST['filename']) ? $_POST['filename'] : "";
    $message = isset($_POST['stacktrace']) ? $_POST['stacktrace'] : "";
    if (!ereg('^[-a-zA-Z0-9_. ]+$', $filename) || $message == ""){
        die("This script is used to log debug data. Please send the "
                . "logging message and a filename as POST variables.");
    }
    file_put_contents($filename, $message . "\n", FILE_APPEND);
?>

index.php

<?php
    $myDirectory = opendir(".");
    while($entryName = readdir($myDirectory)) {
        $dirArray[] = $entryName;
    }
    closedir($myDirectory);
    $indexCount = count($dirArray);
    sort($dirArray);
    print("<TABLE border=1 cellpadding=5 cellspacing=0 \n");
    print("<TR><TH>Filename</TH><TH>Filetype</th><th>Filesize</TH></TR>\n");
    for($index=0; $index < $indexCount; $index++) {
        if ((substr("$dirArray[$index]", 0, 1) != ".") 
                && (strrpos("$dirArray[$index]", ".stacktrace") != false)){ 
            print("<TR><TD>");
            print("<a href=\"$dirArray[$index]\">$dirArray[$index]</a>");
            print("</TD><TD>");
            print(filetype($dirArray[$index]));
            print("</TD><TD>");
            print(filesize($dirArray[$index]));
            print("</TD></TR>\n");
        }
    }
    print("</TABLE>\n");
?>

See also original question in stackoverflow

#90: Standard Android Button with a different color (Score: 742)

Created: 2009-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-30

Tags: android, android-layout

I’d like to change the color of a standard Android button slightly in order to better match a client’s branding.

The best way I’ve found to do this so far is to change the Button’s drawable to the drawable located in res/drawable/red_button.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>    
<selector xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
    <item android:state_pressed="true" android:drawable="@drawable/red_button_pressed" />
    <item android:state_focused="true" android:drawable="@drawable/red_button_focus" />
    <item android:drawable="@drawable/red_button_rest" />
</selector>

But doing that requires that I actually create three different drawables for each button I want to customize (one for the button at rest, one when focused, and one when pressed). That seems more complicated and non-DRY than I need.

All I really want to do is apply some sort of color transform to the button. Is there an easier way to go about changing a button’s color than I’m doing?

#90 Best answer 1 of Standard Android Button with a different color (Score: 733)

Created: 2009-11-13 Last updated: 2010-07-22

I discovered that this can all be done in one file fairly easily. Put something like the following code in a file named custom_button.xml and then set background="@drawable/custom_button" in your button view:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<selector
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

    <item android:state_pressed="true" >
        <shape>
            <gradient
                android:startColor="@color/yellow1"
                android:endColor="@color/yellow2"
                android:angle="270" />
            <stroke
                android:width="3dp"
                android:color="@color/grey05" />
            <corners
                android:radius="3dp" />
            <padding
                android:left="10dp"
                android:top="10dp"
                android:right="10dp"
                android:bottom="10dp" />
        </shape>
    </item>
    
    <item android:state_focused="true" >
        <shape>
            <gradient
                android:endColor="@color/orange4"
                android:startColor="@color/orange5"
                android:angle="270" />
            <stroke
                android:width="3dp"
                android:color="@color/grey05" />
            <corners
                android:radius="3dp" />
            <padding
                android:left="10dp"
                android:top="10dp"
                android:right="10dp"
                android:bottom="10dp" />
        </shape>
    </item>

    <item>        
        <shape>
            <gradient
                android:endColor="@color/blue2"
                android:startColor="@color/blue25"
                android:angle="270" />
            <stroke
                android:width="3dp"
                android:color="@color/grey05" />
            <corners
                android:radius="3dp" />
            <padding
                android:left="10dp"
                android:top="10dp"
                android:right="10dp"
                android:bottom="10dp" />
        </shape>
    </item>
</selector>

#90 Best answer 2 of Standard Android Button with a different color(Score: 310)

Created: 2010-08-15 Last updated: 2010-08-15

Following on from Tomasz’s answer, you can also programmatically set the shade of the entire button using the PorterDuff multiply mode. This will change the button colour rather than just the tint.

If you start with a standard grey shaded button:

button.getBackground().setColorFilter(0xFFFF0000, PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLY);

will give you a red shaded button,

button.getBackground().setColorFilter(0xFF00FF00, PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLY);

will give you a green shaded button etc., where the first value is the colour in hex format.

It works by multiplying the current button colour value by your colour value. I’m sure there’s also a lot more you can do with these modes.

See also original question in stackoverflow


Notes:
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